News

2019

December

Arizona State University and the Be A Leader Foundation have been awarded a grant to form a Network for School Improvement (NSI) to expand their existing school partnerships to build the K–12 pipel

One guaranteed part of dealing with computer systems is that hardware problems happen.

Editor’s note: This is part of a series of profiles for fall

The growth in Arizona’s economy is slowing but the outlook remains strong for 2020, according to Arizona State University’s economic outlook expert.

Roaring '20s-era physicist Ernest Rutherford is purported to have said, “It should be possible to explain the laws of physics to a barmaid,” which is said to be the antecedent to Albert Einstein’s

Public distrust in the media has taken on another dimension in the digital age.

As thousands of community members packed the parking lot of the North Phoenix Baptist Church to check out the float entries for the APS Electric Light Parade, Special Event Management students ente

Tropical forests are the most biologically diverse ecosystems on our planet, harboring an estimated 3 million to 50 million species.

The moon is thought to have formed 4.5 billion years ago after a planetary embryo known as “Theia” collided with proto-Earth (Earth at an early stage).

Steve Borden, director of the Pat Tillman Veterans Center, is leaving Arizona State Univers

Imagine a smartphone app that can identify whether your pet is a cat or dog based off a photo. How does it know? Enter machine learning and an unimaginable amount of data.

Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego talked about her job — that it’s very rewarding but involves dealing with criticism — and encouraged students to sign up

In 2002, virologist Eckard Wimmer led a team at the State University of New York at Stony Brook that created a live polio virus from chemicals, using internet information and mail-order DNA.

Lots of things have to be invented and perfected before people explore deep space: suits, radiation protection, habitats, communications.

Darlene Lim is on it.

Popular Science magazine has given one of its top accolades to a device developed by Arizona State University researchers that can pull carbon gas from ambient air.

For as long as there has been a legal profession, diversity has been lacking. Despite statistical improvements in recent years, it remains one of the least diverse fields in the United States.

There is now a device for almost everything, like smartwatches that ensure you never miss a text message and thermostats capable of learning how warm you like your living room.

The X-Men’s Professor Charles Xavier uses Cerebro to read minds. Arizona State University’s Gi-Yeul Bae “reads minds” by decoding the brain’s electrical activity.

Descending into the basement of Biodesign Institute Building C, a stillness settles around you.

Across the globe, caring for loved ones is what matters most. But for decades this has not been the focus of many social psychology studies.

Downtown Phoenix doughnut lovers rejoiced this year when beloved Valley chain Bosa Donuts opened not one, not two, but three locations within a 1-mile radius.

Early in November, researchers from around the world gathered at Arizona State University’s Tempe campus for an unusual scientific conference.

For the first time, scientists have developed a method to monitor carbon emissions from tropical forests with an unprecedented level of detail.

Three teams recently won the local Alliance for the American Dream competition at Arizona State University.

November

Today is deadlift day.

For decades, the NCAA has adamantly opposed the idea of student-athletes being paid to play college sports. That position is no longer tenable.

The U.S. economic outlook is healthy, according to key economic indicators. Will it remain steady in 2020?

People who live in rural Arizona share many of the same concerns as their urban counterparts, but they also face unique challenges and wish for a bigger share of support from the state, according t

The Engineering Projects in Community Service, or EPICS, program in the Ira A.

Can insecticides, industrial and commercial pollutants, antimicrobials, heavy metals and air pollutants contribute to the onset of Alzheimer’s?

Scientists at Arizona State University and the University of Toronto have developed the first direct gene-circuit-to-electrode interface by combining cell-free synthetic biology with state-of-the-a

The air, earth and water of our planet are pulsating with living things. Within it, a vast and diverse web of life exists, about which almost nothing is known.

Russian grid hacking. Cyberinfiltration of U.S. universities. Rampant data exposures. Spy tool-breaching. Shadow Brokers. And more.

Obesity is the single largest cause of diabetes. And the advice to solve it is often the same: Get off the couch. Hit the gym. Run around the block.

Being a successful student is about more than just passing classes.

Imagine navigating campus using a 3D map, or learning using virtual and augmented reality in the classrooms of the future.

Kathleen Yetman grew up knowing where her food came from.

Arizona’s ability to roll with the punches, which shapes and shifts over time, is largely dependent on proactive planning, swift actions and openness to change, according to an Arizona State Univer

Faculty and graduate students from the Hugh Downs School of Human Communication were awarded $10,000 from the

Arizona State University students Valielza O’Keefe and Joshua Pardhe took first place in the inaugural Regents’ Cup debate competition this weekend, each winning $16,600 in a one-time scholarship t

Arizona State University’s Center for Violence Prevention and Community Safety received a new grant to evaluate a program that will train police in the emergency treatment of opioid overdoses

College admissions ask a lot: a standout essay, a high grade point average and stellar standardized test scores.

Eighth grade student Debbie from Country Meadows Elementary School in Peoria dreams of becoming a computer programmer someday. But until this week, she had never met a woman in that role.

It is nearly impossible not to view screens on a daily basis: Phones, tablets, smart watches — we can check social media, send texts, respond to email and watch Y

Like many arts organizations, the recession was tough on Arizona Opera, which is now working to ensure its financial future.

Five Arizona State University graduates will be inducted into the 42nd annual W. P. Carey School of Business Alumni Hall of Fame on Friday, Nov. 22.

Arizona State University Professor Carol Lynn Martin contributed to a groundbreaking new study on transgender and cisgender children’s developmen

Added sugar is one of the most common ingredients in the American diet and is featured in most processed foods, fruit drinks, sodas, cookies and candy.

Veterans in Arizona are at more than twice the risk of the rest of the population of dying by suicide, according to new information from Arizona State University’s Center for Violence Prevention an

The oldest living organism on Earth is a plant — Methuselah, a bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva, pictured above) that is more than 5,000 years old.

The first map showing the global geology of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, has been completed and fully reveals a dynamic world of dunes, lakes, plains, craters and other terrains.

To study the swiftness of biology — the protein chemistry behind every life function — scientists need to see molecules changing and interacting in unimaginably rapid time increments: tr

Arizona State University students took on challenges in robotics, machine learning and artificial intelligence alongside their peers from universities and community colleges across the state at the

Hiking through hidden caverns bathed with rays of sunlight from above and exploring a traditional Navajo hogan were among the many ways more than 20 Arizona State University tourism students learne

Arizona State University has received five prestigious Department of Energy awards totaling $9.8 million, ranking it first among all university recipients and second overall for this year’s

Researchers from ASU’s Biodesign Institute, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Illinois, report that they have successfully simulated every atom of a light-harvesting structure

Colleen Patrick-Goudreau didn’t grow up vegan.

She grew up in New Jersey.

College might last four years, but the Arizona State University Department of Psychology remains committed to students for much longer.

Political corruption can breed distrust among citizens, but it turns out to be bad for businesses as well, according to recent research by an Arizona State University professor.

Michael Spangenberg said he was always that “one weird dude” in his Chandler classroom who was born in Arizona. Still, he didn’t realize that Arizona was the 48th state to join the country.

All plants need carbon dioxide, or CO2, to live. They extract it from the air and use it during the photosynthesis process to feed themselves.

Four faculty members from Arizona State University received grants from the Flinn Foundation to further their bioscience research.

Regenerative medicine promises to revolutionize medical care at its most basic foundations. But fulfilling its potential requires advances in multiple branches of science and engineering.

Arizona has seen some improvements in child welfare, but the gains are not equal for all groups — and that's an issue that the state must face, according to Judy Krysik, director of the

For human males (usually in their 20s), appealing to a potential mate often involves body spray, long stints at the gym and conspicuous bottle service at the club. 

What is the nature of social justice? How can each of us take action in a way that is responsible to the whole community?

A smile, an encouraging word, a warm greeting, a small note of thanks — all solid examples of kindness.

The Salt River Valley has always revolved around two things: the sun above and the river below.

A new research study has revealed that larval fish species from various ocean habitats are now being threatened by plastic pollution that infects their nursery habitats — at levels on average

The ability to transform sunlight into energy is one of nature’s more remarkable feats.

Arizona State University astrobiologist and physicist Sara Imari Walker of the School of Earth and Space Explor

What happens when technology advancements threaten to automate people’s jobs?

Judging others is a very human behavior. Stigma — treating people with specific traits as unwanted within society — is a particularly harmful manifestation of that.

Todd Canterbury not only followed in his father’s footsteps, he practically mirrored them.

Stressed, exhausted and sitting in a hospital waiting room, the last thing anyone wants to do is spend half an hour filling out paperwork.

A couple miles away from Arizona State University’s Tempe campus is a building filled with fascinating sights ranging from stuffed javelinas to ancient fossils and rocks. 

Some of the most innovative and groundbreaking research at Arizona State University is taking place in indigenous communities and on reservations around the Copper State and beyo

Viruses are all around us — they are present in most environments, lying in wait for the optimal host, and they even reside within our bodies, whether we know it or not.

How do scientists discover better and more efficient drugs? A good starting point is to obtain atomic level structural information about the drug molecules and the proteins they interact with.

The Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University is hosting its seventh annual Gold ‘n Gavel event on Nov.

Nobel laureate and physicist Richard Feynman wrote in 1965, “I think I can safely say that nobody understands quantum mechanics.” Quantum mechanics is now much better understood, and recently in th

Update: Arizona State University undergraduates Valielza O’Keefe, a physics major, and Joshua Pardhe, a computer systems engineering major, won first

During the first flickering of life on earth, ribonucleic acid (RNA) occupied center stage.

Between 1910 and 1970, the African American population of Arizona grew from 2,000 to over 54,000, according to a new exhibit on display at Arizona State University’s School of Human Evolution and S

Editor’s note: This is the second Q&A in a

October

Todd Lemay remembers longing for snowless days. The weather constricted the Maine native in ways others couldn’t comprehend. That wasn’t all; steps robbed him of his freedom.

The way we see ourselves — cheerful, cool, daring — often translates into the products we buy, which in turn creates a “personality” for the brands we consume.

When people move to the United States, their journey to assimilation is a complex process that involves change for everyone in the community, according to two authors who have studied this contempo

Amid the zoo of biomolecules essential to life, enzymes are among the most vital.

You might have spotted one rummaging through a garbage can on Arizona State University’s Tempe campus, or perched high above your head on Palm Walk.

The centuries-long transformation of Halloween from an ancient Celtic festival to the commercialized holiday we know today brought with it many changes.

Halloween is big business in the United States.

Cannibals. Vampires. Zombies. Parasites that devour you from within.

Whatever abomination prowls your nightmares and sends cold sweat trickling down your spine, nature likely has it beat.

Between the costumes, decorations and props, temporary Halloween stores — like Spirit Halloween — provide a one-stop shopping experience for all things spooky.

Would you buy an outdoor water fountain for your dog? Or a bendable power strip? Or a coffee table with a built-in refrigerator?

Research that is helping regional communities solve their wastewater pollution problems has earned Otakuye Conroy-Ben a

A team of scientists, including Efrem Lim, a virologist at the Arizona State University Biodesign Center for Fundamental and Applied Microbiomics  and a

An Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia diagnosis impacts more than just the person receiving it.

Alarmed by the cars speeding through her quiet Austin, Arkansas, neighborhood, Jennifer Moreau had the aha moment that began her journey as a health advocacy warrior. 

Shakespeare was hardly the first to acknowledge mankind’s shared humanity, but the words he used to do so are inarguably enduring.

Engineers from all disciplines gather each year to exchange ideas and promote new techniques and approaches across fields to build and sustain innovation in the United States.

People have a number of reasons for adopting plant-based diets, from improving their health to concerns about animal treatment to a desire to minimize their carbon footprint.

A nuclear physicist, a high school student and three undergraduates find themselves sharing a table at Arizona State University.

Thousands of scientists are hard at work across the country, but their innovations don’t always make it out of their labs.

There's an insidious threat that seeks to divide the nation and undermine our faith in democracy — disinformation.

Technology is hurtling forward, and a policy group at Arizona State University is working to make sure that tribal nations across the country are not being left further behind.

An important part of Peter Crozier’s job involves watching dances. He views these intricate performances through state-of-the-art, high-powered microscopes because the dancers are atoms.

When Lillian Keyes visited Washington, D.C., from Poughkeepsie, New York, on Friday, she didn’t know she would have the opportunity to visit Mars as well.

“Phoenix will be a great city when it’s finished,” said a visitor in the 1950s.

While making her way around the city on a recent afternoon, Arizona State University Professor Patricia Friedrich noticed something about the cr

Arizona State University psychology graduate student Victoria Woner is traveling to Chicago this week as a winner of the prestigious Society for Neuroscience Trainee Professional Development Award.

These jeans still fit.

I could do that abstract painting.

I could take that guy.

They go together like milk and cookies. Peanut butter and jelly. Batman and Robin. Disease and mosquitos. Wait, what?

The Arizona Bioindustry Association (AZBio) has named OncoMyx Therapeutics, Inc., an Arizona State Univers

Eliminating barriers to learning is at the heart of the ASU 

PBS NewsHour West, the new bureau and West Coast feed of “PBS NewsHour,” hit the air for the first time on Monday from inside the Cronkite School.

College wasn’t even on Sergio Loza’s radar when a recruiter came to visit his high school in the mostly Latino, low-income neighborhood of Maryvale in Phoenix during his senior year.

Growing up in Phoenix, Arizona State University alumna Laura Medina enjoyed getting the day off school for Columbus Day every October. But she also remembers feeling conflicted.

Alexis Hocken did not have many female STEM role models to look up to gro

A research team from the MIPT Center for Molecular Mechanisms of Aging and Age-Related Diseases collaborated with colleagues from the U.S.,

For the fifth consecutive year, Arizona State University has been ranked as a top producer of educators by Teach For America,

The 19th Amendment of the American Constitution officially gave women the right to vote in 1920, putting to rest decades

Latino youth and young adults born and raised in United States who are fluent in English and steeped in American culture still feel excluded from this country. Though they are politically active an

This summer, the Navajo Generating Station, a coal-fired power plant that has been providing jobs and economic support for residents in and around Page, Arizona, for nearly half a century, lost its

We humans like to think we invent things, but in a lot of cases, nature did it first.

One year after a large-scale restructuring, Arizona State University’s College of Health Solutions has announced growth in enrollment, new faculty and research advancement.  

Odds are that someone in your immediate circle is dealing with breast cancer, given that it affects 1 in 8 women in the United States. Simply being a woman is the single largest risk factor i

A lot had changed in the 15 years since Earl Swift last set foot on Tangier Island, located in Virginia’s Chesapeake Bay.

A recent study published in “Circulation,” the journal of the American Heart Association, concludes that having a dog is associated with a lower risk of death in humans, especially in humans who ha

One in four suicides in Arizona are related to violence involving an intimate partner, according to a new report from Arizona State University’s Center for Vi

A team of undergraduate researchers at Arizona State University spent a year mining and analyzing data to produce a first-of-its-kind report that ranks 115 cities in three countries on how easy it

Every semester, when thousands of students move their graduation cap tassels from right to left, it doesn’t mean education has ended for them.

With organizations the caliber of Mayo Clinic, TGen, the Flinn Foundation, Arizona BioIndustry Association and the state’s universities, Arizona boasts a multitude of talented scientists, health pr

If you could travel back in time 3.5 billion years ago, what would Mars look like?

The challenge of designing a synthetic artificial cell has been accepted by a team of researchers from institutions across the country, including Gi

If you’re Italian, you don’t miss Mama’s “red lead” on Sunday night.

A PhD student at Arizona State University who is finding a way to clean water with light will get the chance to present her research on a global stage after she won the Falling Walls Lab event on F

A newly discovered mineral, navrotskyite, has been named after Arizona State University Professor Alexandra Navrotsky for her significant contr

Last month, Arizona State University alumna Shaandiin Parrish stood in front of a crowd at the annual Navajo Nation Fair and waited to learn whether she’d become Miss Navajo Nation 2019.

We’re quickly outpacing the abilities of the current generation of wireless communication technology, commonly known as 4G.

Arizona State University's Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication has a unique fall break opportunity for teens interested in sports journalism.

Over the past couple of decades, depictions of Latino characters have become more frequent in popular media, from Sofía Vergara’s portrayal of Gloria, the Colombian-born wife of the family patriarc

Sometimes the best conversations are the ones where all we do is listen. And when it comes to communing with the environment, there’s a lot that can be learned.

For more than a decade, scientist Stephen Albert Johnston and his team at Arizona State University’s Biodesign Institute have pooled their energ

Over the summer, Arizona State University's School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning invited seven students to participate in the inaugural Urban Equity

Sediment samples, collected from the ocean floor, have unlocked scientific mysteries around the world.

Catalysis is an essential component of industrial chemistry and the economic and societal benefits of catalysis are almost incalculable.

Human behavior over time has been extraordinarily complex; that's partly why so many different fields exist to study it.

Even though Arizona State University is situated in the Sonoran Desert, it happens to be one of the “greenest” places on Earth.

Human behavior over time has been extraordinarily complex; that's partly why so many different fields exist to study it.

A rocket launches into space. It escapes the Earth’s atmosphere and falls away from the payload. The nose cone peels away. The main payload, a 15,000-pound satellite, deploys.

The Pitt Hopkins Research Foundation announces its first-ever human clinical trial to attempt to eradicate the severe gastrointestinal effects of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS), a rare disorder cause

What’s better than spending a hot Arizona summer working in a cool basement?

September

A community garden occupies a diminutive dirt lot in Phoenix.

Menstruation may be a taboo topic to bring up in social settings, but it happens to roughly half of the population of the world.

At one time or another, we were all scientists. There is a reason a child’s first questions include: “What is it?”, “Why?” and “How?”

In a new study, Arizona State University Biodesign Institute researchers reveal that a lifelong dietary regimen of choline holds the potential to prevent Alzheimer's disease.

Arizona State University joined with thousands of students, parents, educators and college access partners around the country to celebrate

Arizona State University, you may have heard, is known for being innovative.

True crime shows are beloved by many for their comprehensive (if not entirely accurate) portrayal of forensics investigations.

Your body is bustling with electrical activity.

September is Recovery Month, a national observance designed to increase awareness and understanding of mental and substance

Without the human body, sport as we know it would not exist.

Researchers at Arizona State University are busy making preparations for a “first light” experiment — a pivotal moment that will lead to ASU becoming the birthplace of the compact X-ray free electr

Our current approach to nature conservation needs to change.

Growing up in California, Julian Lim, assistant professor at the Arizona State University School of Historical

Americans today are being assailed by the rise of “fake news” and a growing combativeness around democratic principles, including freedom of the p

A dermal regenerator was the medical tool used to repair spaceship crew members’ wounds on the science fiction TV show “Star Trek.”

The Pew Research Center has reported that more and more people identify the

The First Amendment and the free press are under continual assault — withering attacks from the current president, foreign governments, outlets that produce fake news and a weary public who have gr

Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego faced a room of middle schoolers from Phoenix’s Creighton School District as she shared a few candid stories about when things didn’t go exactly as she planned in her lif

Industry and academic partnerships are critical to strengthening innovation, talent and economic development in the Phoenix metro area.

Cooperative behaviors, which differ from one country to another, from one community to another, can make the world an interesting — though sometimes challenging place — to live.

What the food industry needs now is more players in a circular food economy — one that improves rather than degrades the environment.

Professor Paul Hirt wears many hats at Arizona State University as well as in the community: active public speaker, lecturer and facilitator.

Two years ago, Yiamar Rivera-Matos was at home with her family in Jayuya, a rural mountain town of about 12,000 people in the center of Puerto Rico, when Hurricane Maria hit.

When Aristotle coined the phrase, “The whole is greater than the sum of its parts,” he may not have been referring to composite materials — but ceramic matrix composites, or CMCs, embody this princ

Every first Thursday in downtown Phoenix, a revolution is stirring at the Get Lit salon series, a recently revived community literary event facilit

Witches, pagans and polytheists: They’re not seance-holding weirdos, tree-worshipping nudists or Stonehenge-dancing hippies.

Knowing someone who has been deported could make children more than twice as likely to be diagnosed with or screened for a developmental disorder, according to the findings of an interdiscipl

From a project focused on mobile home parks to work with indigenous communities, members from the Arizona State University School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning were recognized for the

Your grandparents would just call it being rude, but Millennials and Generation Z call a troubling new trend in courtship “ghosting.”

Editor's note: This piece was written by May Busch, senior adviser and executive in residence in ASU’s Office of the President. She is also a professor of practice in the W.

“Umm, hey, sorry to bother you, can you please, and correct me if I’m wrong, but can you just let me know if this is what you were looking for?

Roughly 5.8 million Americans are currently living with Alzheimer’s disease, and by 2050, that number is expected to increase to roughly 14 million.

Arizona State University football Head Coach Herm Edwards is as comfortable in front of a microphone as he is on the gridiron.

Deep within the subterranean confines of Building C — the latest addition to the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University — a pathbreaking machine is quietly taking shape.

In September 1787, the delegates of the Constitutional Convention took the monumental step of signing the document they had drafted during the convention and which would become the Constitution of

For over two decades, Jose Antonio Vargas was hiding in plain sight. 

Earth is enormous, and while humans have done a decent job of being able to map out the boundaries of countries and states, the roads in our cities and the location of geological sightseeing destin

When astronaut Lt. Col.

With a snip of the scissors on Friday, Arizona State University sealed a partnership with the global corporation Infosys that will accelerate workforce develop

Nowadays, you don’t have to look very hard to see the power of big data.

Imagine being fully aware of the present moment, all of your sensations, feelings and thoughts, and being OK with it.

Even the most high-quality health care delivered by conscientious providers can fall short of optimal performance when hindered by inefficient patient access management.

Suicide, which is responsible for more than 800,000 deaths annually worldwide, is now the second leading cause of death among young adults, ahead of homicide, drugs and alcohol, cancer and heart di

Former Major League Baseball Commissioner and Distinguished Professor of Sports in America at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University,

Should the mission of a company focus only on the bottom line? Maybe not.

Local authorities are asking Phoenix metro area residents to protect themselves from mosquito bites and get rid of standing water where the insects can breed due to a sharp increase in West Nile vi

Nearly half of physical therapy patients are age 65 and older.

This summer, when James Sulikowski announced on Twitter that he was moving his Shark and Fish Conse

Suicides are up across the board in America, according to a recent national study showing a 33% increase since two decades ago, the highest since World War II.

How important is mom? What about dad?

Frequent incidents over the past few years in which appearances by conservative speakers have been shut down or canceled at college campuses are an alarming threat to free speech, according to libe

Cheryl Hyman has traveled the pathway to success. Now, she wants to make sure it is available for others. Many, many others. 

Among Jupiter’s 79 moons, Europa jumps out at planetary scientists. Covered in an ice crust, it has the smoothest surface of any object in the solar system.

In today’s health conscious community, kombucha is all the rage.

Securing enough energy to meet human needs is one of the greatest challenges society has ever faced.

Wildfires are widespread across the globe.

August

J. Orin Edson built his first boat when he was just a kid boating around Lake Washington.

Hollywood has always imagined the arrival of beings from other worlds as the cause to run through streets screaming, call up fighter jets, or, when all else fails, send in Tom Cruise.

How are people’s political beliefs organized, and what leads them to subscribe to certain beliefs?

The Southwest’s long-standing drought has left the state staring down a historic and first-ever Colorado River water cutback in 2020. 

If all goes as planned, one day this October a spacecraft the size of jumbo loaf of bread will leave from Wallops, Virginia, packed aboard a cargo rocket bound for the International Space Station.

Arizona is facing a colossal challenge in managing its water supply — especially with the uncertainty of climate change effects.

Nearly 1 in 4 Arizona teens have used a highly potent form of marijuana known as marijuana concentrate, according to a new study by Arizona State University researchers.

When researchers examined the mitochondrial DNA of Ötzi, a man entombed in ice some 5,300 years ago, high in the Tyrolean Alps, they made a startling discovery.

The trial of Scott Warren took center stage this summer in the nation’s passionate debate over immigration.

Last week, scientists began the first human clinical trials using the gene-editing tool CRISPR to combat cancer and blood disorders.

Arizona State University’s Project Humanities has developed a reputation for its provocative and engaging programming.

Everyone wants to be appreciated at work, and inclusive and culturally diverse workplaces are

Arizona has recovered from the recession of a decade ago, but it’s a responsibility of the three public universities to further strengthen the state’s fragile economy, according to Michael Crow, pr

With advances in technology and our understanding of the human body come better techniques for diagnosing disease.

Just as it’s increasingly common to find a smart home assistant on a countertop or an internet-connected camera at the front door, smart toys are also becoming ubiquitous in the playroom.

They order more paper towels for you and set a timer with just a phrase. They let you know who’s at the door before you open it.

If you sit in a typical lecture hall at any university, you’ll likely see some students distracted by their phones, or worse, napping or tuned out.

Cosmochemistry expert and new ASU School of Earth and Space Exploration (SESE) Director Meenakshi Wadhwa and drylands researcher

Each year, the city of Tempe recognizes one individual or organization as a “Bike Hero” — highlighting the work being done in the community to increase awareness and promoting bicycling as a viable

Anthony Johnson arrived in Virginia in 1621. He farmed other people’s land in the new English colony before he acquired land of his own and wealth.

The Economic Club of Phoenix speaker series — hosted by Arizona State University's W. P.

The path to college can be challenging for many people, but youths who have been in foster care can face extra obstacles.

Students at Arizona State University can choose from hundreds of degree programs, and any one of them can lead to a lifelong commitment to treating the planet gently.

An Arizona State University professor said the state’s rivers are only going to see shortages in the future, which will have a direct impact not only on humans, but wildlife and their habitats.

In high school chemistry, we all learned about chemical reactions. But what brings two reacting molecules together?

Anyone in the metro Phoenix area can fish in urban lakes and ponds and eat the fish they catch. The only thing required is a Class U (Urban) fishing license, which is $16 for the year.

Consumers have increasingly become victims of telephone scams — including the recent proliferation of Social Security number suspension ploys — to gain access to their personal information.

More than a hundred years after they were first identified, two ominous signposts of Alzheimer’s disease remain central topics of research — both formed by sticky accumulations of protein in the br

Third-plus generation students — those born in the U.S. to U.S.-born parents — attend better-resourced schools compared to first- and second-generation students from immigrant families.

Getting involved in research as an undergraduate can have significant benefits, such as enhancing a student’s ability to think critically, increasing their understanding of how to conduct a researc

From hair and eye color to how our biological system is regulated, the blueprint of life is held in the genome.

The Carnegie-Knight News21 program, a national multi-university reporting initiative headquartered at Arizona Stat

Even though it may seem at first that the internet is an almost infinite source of knowledge, one needs to know how to properly navigate it in order to discern what’s truthful.

Some of the world’s most accomplished scientific minds will converge on Arizona State University’s Tempe campus Nov.

Sun Devil supporters bolstered scholarships, medical advancements, professorships and research opportunities as part of a banner fundraising year for the ASU Foundation.

Strong, lightweight aluminum-copper alloys have been used in aircraft and automotive designs for decades, but little is known about their structural mechanisms during deformation.

Editor's note: Aug. 11 marks the end of "the dog days of summer," the most sweltering days of the year.

A new type of blood test for breast cancer could help avoid thousands of unnecessary surgeries and otherwise precisely monitor disease progression, according to a study led by the 

About 35 million years ago, an asteroid hit the ocean off the East Coast of North America.

In June, the Arizona State University-led mast-mounted camera system for NASA’s Mars 2020 rover mission, "Mastcam-Z," was delivered to NASA’s Jet Propu

Each year, nearly 20% of U.S. students do not finish high school on time, which experts say puts them at high risk for poverty, poor health and early mortality.

Earlier this summer, almost 100 cars ended up stuck in a muddy Colorado field. An accident in Denver led Google Maps to suggest an alternate route to the airport.

North Korean hackers squeeze $2 billion out of cryptocurrency networks. Russian hackers breach networks using "internet of things" devices.

There aren’t any great white sharks in the Colorado River, but a picture of them captivated Briana Morgan and propelled her into a career of working on water conservation in Lake Havasu City.

In the modern world, everyone is a potential outsider when it comes to civil rights, according to Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law professor and associate dean

Unproven and unregulated stem cell therapies for treatments for conditions ranging from Parkinson’s disease to multiple sclerosis to macular degeneration are putting patients at risk in a market th

If there is any consolation to be found in cancer, it may be that the devastating disease dies with the individual carrying it. Or so it had long been assumed.

July

Comparing a living cell to a virus is a bit like comparing the Sistine Chapel to a backyard doghouse.

Humans and animals can develop resistance to harmful bacteria (pathogens) over time or with help from antibiotics or vaccines.

Even as they are separated from their communities, the men who are incarcerated at the Arizona State Prison Complex in Florence are finding a way to give back, with help from Arizona State Universi

It’s the night of Sept. 8, 2014. Over metropolitan Phoenix, a summer monsoon collides with a dying Pacific hurricane. Rain gushes from the skies. Freeway pumps on Interstate 10 fail.

Earlier this summer, the sixth-largest city in India, Chennai, ran out of water. The cause wasn’t just a weak monsoon.

Scientists know that air pollution affects plant populations.

An award-winning national editor for the Associated Press and a five-time Emmy Award-winning journalist are joining a Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication effort to provide q

The microbial world of viruses is poised to attack. Viral, nonliving entities have the ability to infect you and spread to others, jumping from host to host to host.

Drinking alcohol alone can be a warning sign of alcohol abuse. But drinking in stimulating group environments can put p

Most cases of anxiety and depression among school-age children are untreated. Among those receiving treatment, prescriptions and counseling for pediatric anxiety are only 60% effective.

With bee populations on the decline, researchers have a growing interest in the viruses that may be affecting them.

It started out as a typical day at work for ant researcher Christina Kwapich.

Gas-giant planets orbiting close to other stars have powerful magnetic fields, many times stronger than our own Jupiter, according to a new study by a team of astrophysicists.

How much of what you learned in high school do you still use 20 years later? Probably not a lot.

Fifty years ago, the Eagle landed.

“Man on the moon!” said CBS television news anchor Walter Cronkite, whose exclamation would make for worldwide headlines the next day.

Most Americans believe science and religion are incompatible, but a recent study suggests that

Editor's note: July 3 marked the start of "the dog days of summer," the most sweltering days of the year.

The community of viruses is staggeringly vast.

Most lawyers spend years preparing for law school. Tonya MacBeth, a 2005 graduate of the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University, is not most lawyers.

As the Apollo 11 Lunar Module approached the moon's surface for the first manned landing, commander Neil Armstrong switched off the auto-targeting feature of the LM's computer and flew the spacecra

Tamales, churros, raspados, elotes. On the streets of Los Angeles, the hands that serve these dishes from the shade of a vending cart may belong to a child with a special family role.

There are a few things in life upon which we can rely, and one of those things is that Phoenix is hot in the summer. But how hot? It’s a more complicated question than you might think.

Flourishing in spectacular numbers in lakes and ponds around the world, tiny creatures known as Daphnia play an essential role in freshwater ecology.

One of the biggest shopping days of the year is fast approaching.

Arizona State University history alumnus Kino Reed regularly teaches O’odham cultural studies and social studies at Salt River High School near Scottsdale, Arizona.

Earlier this year, winds in Eagar, Arizona, got up to speeds of 80 mph, and the jungle gym on the playground at the Boys and Girls Club of Round Valley took flight and lan

Editor's note: July 3 marked the start of "the dog days of summer," the most sweltering days of the year.

Standing for hours within crowds of people in hot, sunny and humid conditions is a recipe for heat-related illness — but that’s what spectators at the Tokyo Summer Olympics marathons may be dealing

When most people go out and experience nature, they usually dictate the terms and have an agenda.

One of the current paradigms in cancer treatment is not to treat a tumor itself.

Astrophysicists know that iron (chemical symbol: Fe) is one of the most abundant elements in the universe, after lightweight elements such as hydrogen, carbon and oxygen.

For Arizona State University alumna Laura Medina, home started out as a shaky concept.

Honeybees serve as pollinators for the majority of the world’s crops, and their global decline threatens the world’s food supply.

School of Human Evolution and Social Change alumna Sara Becker has one particularly clear memory from her undergraduate years at Arizona State University: the time she nearly ran over Donald Johans

When Nic Sheff was 11 years old, he began drinking vodka. A year later he was using marijuana, soon joined by acid, ecstasy, mushrooms and cocaine.

Finding a leadership style that works. Navigating workplace culture. Balancing work and family. Dealing with sexual harassment.

Arizona State University’s Metis Center for Infrastructure and Sustainable Engineering recently named the first Sustainable Infrastructure Award winners. 

An Arizona State University professor’s new research has discovered that teenagers’ positive perceptions of law enforcement have decreased dramatically in the past few years, even as their confiden

When an earthquake or a tsunami strikes, aid groups and rescue teams begin assessing emergency needs right away. But other crises are harder to quantify.

Editor's note: July 3 marks the start of "the dog days of summer," the most sweltering days of the year.

Editor's note: July 3 marks the start of "the dog days of summer," the most sweltering days of the year.

Arizona State University is a leader in higher education for implementing and achieving sustainability standards.

Neuroscience researcher Benjamin Readhead appears along with National Institutes of Health Director Frances S.

Climate change and water scarcity are looming. Dead zones in the oceans are growing. Ecosystems are eroding.

Just breathe.

If detecting lung infections were as simple as taking a breath, patients with cystic fibrosis would be able to seek treatment sooner.

Project Benjamin, a cross-sector coalition of organizations from Arizona, was provisionally awarded $1 million from Schmidt Futures in the Alliance for the

Google “Dr. Joaquin Bustoz,” and you can find a link to “Apreciación – In Memory of Dr.

June

Meenakshi Wadhwa has looked up her whole life.

Fifty-six years ago, on a humid Sunday in early May, thousands of African American congregants walked calmly out of the New Pilgrim Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, and headed toward the city

It’s March 20, 1911. Former President Theodore Roosevelt is in town for the dedication of a dam 60 miles northeast of the Salt River Valley.

There’s a scene in Season 1, Episode 2 of FX’s acclaimed series "Pose" that chronicles the ballroom culture of New York City in the late '80s and early '90s, wherein one of the main characters, Bla

Inspired by movie streaming services such as Netflix or Hulu, an astrophysicist at the Southwest Research Institute developed a technique to look for stars likely to host giant, Jupiter-sized plane

Recently, the culture is moving to change transportation habits for both health and environmental benefits.

A decade ago, an Atlas V rocket blazed across a bright and clear Florida sky to mark the 21st century's first major lunar rendezvous.

For Jesse Lopez, the opportunity to partner with 

Starting next year, most nutrition labels on food packaging will be updated to be more clear about calories, portion sizes and added sugar. The move by the U.S.

Viruses are likely the most abundant biological entities on Earth — they inhabit every ecosystem and thus have shaped the evolution of most species.

It’s a common story: Developers start transforming public spaces with little to no input from the community — and it doesn’t end happily.

Summer is at hand, and water is a key element in beating the heat.

During World War II, the U.S. government forced around 120,000 Japanese Americans living on the West Coast out of their homes and into 10 different family incarceration centers.

Whether you’re a bacon fanatic, a vegan or somewhere in between, the choices you make about the foods you consume reverberate much further than your own body.

International Women in Engineering Day, celebrated June 23 and founded by United Kingdom-based charity

Dangerous radiation is a fact of life in space.

Look! Up in the sky! It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s …

OK, maybe we don’t know what it is.

Arizona’s new state budget includes $15 million for the Arizona Teachers Academy, which provides tuition scholarships to students pursuing teacher certification at Arizona’s three public univ

In 1899, when Arizona had not yet gained statehood and Arizona State University was a fledgling institution known as the Tempe Normal School, Zebulon Pearce was freshly graduated with teachers cred

Health wasn’t something Maza Wasi ever thought about.

Firearms are the second leading cause of death behind vehicle crashes for young people in the U.S., and gun deaths among people age 19 and younger have skyrocketed 44% since 2013, according to the

The Arizona State University-led mast-mounted camera system for NASA’s Mars 2020 rover mission, "Mastcam-Z," achieved a major milestone recently when the instrument was delivered to NASA’s Jet Prop

President Donald Trump has backed off his threat to impose tariffs on Mexico over the immigration crisis, but he later said that China could face additional tariffs to the ones he imposed on goods

“To sit in the shade on a fine day and look upon verdure is the most perfect refreshment.” — Jane Austen

One of the most practical ways to explore strange new worlds in our solar system is to go in the opposite direction: to the bottom of the ocean.

Advances in technology make modern living easier, from improving communication to creating new tools such as the internet and smartphones; these technological improvements are now being applied to

We all know the meaning of that blue decal with a stick figure person that hangs from rearview mirrors. What we probably don’t know is how to refer to the person it depicts.

The western burrowing owl is like no other bird: It lives underground, is adaptable to urban environments and its idea of a show of force is to surround its nest with dog waste and neighborhood tra

In its May newsletter, Salt River Project gave tips to consumers on how to save money using its new pricing plans and what to do in case of an outage.

Women get autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, eight times more than men do.

The Arizona State University charter describes a commitment to linking innovation with the advancement of research and discovery of public value.

"It all comes out in the wash" is proving to be a more accurate phrase than previously realized, and it may not be good news.

Arizona State University founded the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership in 2017 in part to promote civil discourse and free speech on campus.

In 2015, one of the longest-running hospital systems in the nation and the most innovative university in the nation came together to address the need to accelerate the health and well-being of thei

At a swearing-in ceremony early in May, Arizona State University alumna Arlene Chin became the newest member of the Tempe City Council and the first Asian American woman to hold the position

Two years ago, Arizona State University and Helios Education Foundation began conversations about how the two organizations could work toget

A new archaeological site discovered by an international and local team of scientists — including ASU researchers — working in Ethiopia shows that the origins of stone tool production are older tha

May

Though much has been done over the past few decades to raise awareness about the threat of heart disease, it continues to be the leading killer of women in the United States, accounting for

An Arizona State University professor tackled a polarizing issue in her latest research: genetically modified organisms.

Wherever animals live together as groups, behavior patterns emerge.

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affects an estimated 1 in 59 people in the United States, causing a variety of difficulties with social communication and repetitive behavior.

An Arizona State University faculty member in the School of Sustainability now is the leader of the top climate research providers in the world.

Brandon Vickers served his country for five years while he was a welder in the Navy.

The rates of mental, emotional and behavioral disorders in American youth are all on the rise.

For many youth in foster care, the odds of achieving a college education have historically been low, with

In 2016, what began as a grassroots effort against the Dakota Access Pipeline drilling project in North Dakota grew into a sweeping movement gathering thousands of protesters from around the countr

Each day, more than 1,000 Americans are treated in emergency rooms for opioid use, and

Nanomaterials are a prime example of how extremely small components of matter can make sizable impacts.

Having a conversation is something most of us take for granted. For people with autism, especially children, talking with family or friends can be challenging.

One of the surest signs that spring has sprung is the abundance of fresh blooms sprouting from greenery everywhere.

The spring and early summer temperatures in Arizona are perfect for outdoor activities such as hiking, mountain biking and camping.

A team of scientists from Arizona State University has taken a significant step closer to unlocking the secrets of photosynthesis, by determining the structure of a very large photosynthetic superc

Some students major in the humanities; others take a humanities class just to check off a general credit.

The unseasonably temperate weather in the Phoenix metropolitan area this spring may have everyone scratching their heads, but rest assured, heat will always be a concern in the Valley whose name pa

For the third year, select Arizona State University faculty will spend their summer advancing research and understanding on a significant health challenge, in partnership with Mayo Clinic.

Smiles on every face. Congratulations passed around left and right. Speakers saying they don’t want to speak for too long. Just another scene of another graduation in May.

The dry, arid climate of the Sonoran Desert has created harsh living conditions for several millennia.

In the United States, obesity rates among children ages 2 to 19 years old have skyrocketed from 10% in 1999 to over 18.5% in 2

So you got a Fitbit for Christmas and you were psyched. New year, new me, you thought. Time to pump up the jams and get down to business.

A mammal’s posture while moving, or locomotor posture, plays a key role in how variable the number of vertebrae in its spinal column can be across all members of that species, a team of researchers

According to the National Alliance to End Homelessness, 9,865 people experience homelessness on a given night in Arizona.

On April 23 at 9:09 p.m.

One in four adults in the U.S.

Sarah Phillips, a student at the Watts College of Public Service and Community Solutions, knew Arizona State University was home from the minute she ste

The emerging field of nanotechnology has spurred many advances in energy, defense and medicine applications.

You are what you eat. But first, you are what your mother eats. And it wasn’t that long ago when no one blinked an eye at a pregnant woman sipping a cocktail.

Maintaining software is costly, and for developers like Facebook and Microsoft, repairing software bugs can be very expensive.

Power electronics are the middle step between the electrical grid and your electronic devices.

Who doesn’t love a garden? Turning the soil and planting seeds or seedlings just so, then watering and witnessing subtle, then significant growth over time.

Cancer is a protean disease, assuming many forms and disguises. Despite enormous strides in research in past decades, some cancers remain persistently lethal.

This spring marks the 35th anniversary of ASU’s Hispanic Mother-Daughter Program that aims to increase the number of first-ge

Ad spending broke records during the 2018 m

“Eat healthier and exercise more.”

A toddler sat alone in the middle of a pile of toys, absorbed in stacking plastic blocks to form an unsteady tower.

A bold proposal for the future of most of the nearly 2,000-mile stre

Wastewater treatment and reuse are critical to global health and sustaining a world population predicted to reach 10 billion by 2050.

In fall 2017, the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) camera on NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter took a series of images of the Martian moon Phobos.

History has shown that positive things can happen when individuals unite for the greater good.

The popular adage that men are from Mars and women are from Venus might seem an antiquated notion nowadays.

It doesn’t take special insight to recognize dog owners love their dogs. A lot.

Arizona State University Associate Professor Heather Switzer and alumna Anastasia Todd are using the power of narrative to break the current fr

Scientists know that age and weight are risk factors in the development of cancer.

FBI director Christopher Wray invites you to visit him in Washington, D.C., where you will share a spotlight with country crooner Dolly Parton: All in a day’s work?

Frank Smith III arrived at Arizona State University knowing what he planned to be when he grew up.

Brass, bronze and steel are metal alloys in which the combination of chemical elements — copper and zinc, copper and tin, iron and carbon, respectively — create unique properties, such as high stre

Arizona State University empowers students to find their places, like the newsroom, the trading floor or the design studio.

Meet Trilly: The black-and-tan, floppy-eared, 9-year-old Gordon setter may have just made medical history by receiving a shot that may contain the very first vaccine intended to prevent cancer.

In 2010, Tomas Robles found himself in Phoenix with an accounting job he didn’t love and what felt like a troubling political tide he was powerless to impact.

Fake news. Weaponized narratives. Agitprop.

It’s all chatter, until someone puts down the keyboard, picks up a gun and walks into a house of worship.

How do you fight that?

Artificial intelligence has made impressive strides.

Luminosity at Arizona State University is where interdisciplinary teams of students with bright ideas dream big.

Improving the quality of food for families in South Phoenix will likely require many changes, ranging from policy updates at the federal level to a stronger focus on culture at the family level, ac

The world’s top chess player isn’t a human or a computer, it’s a “centaur” — a hybrid chess-playing team composed of a human and a computer.

For Meli’sa Crawford, talking about poop isn’t gross or impolite — it’s an important part of a day’s work. Crawford is an Arizona State University PhD candidate who studies poop to lea

Early one spring evening in a bright green workout room at a YMCA in west Phoenix, a petite woman stands at the head of a group of parents and their children demonstrating jump squats.

Arizona’s economy is thriving and is likely to flourish at least for another year, according to economics experts at Arizona State University.

Two cosmochemists at Arizona State University have made the first-ever measurements of water contained in samples from the surface of an asteroid.

April

Intensive investigations into the nature of cancer have given rise to innovative and unorthodox approaches to countering this deadly affliction.

Crime is down in Arizona but more people are in prison, and confronting that issue will require a broad range of changes plus a lot of courage, according to a group discussion on criminal justice r

On a recent sunny Saturday at Arizona State University, the Tempe campus was buzzing with middle and high schoolers in lab coats and goggles, sprinting between buildings and labs.

Arizona State University and Silicon Kingdom Holdings (SKH) have announced an agreement to deploy carbon-capture technology developed by Professor

No matter where you are in the United States, the food on your plate probably started its life in Fresno, California.

What makes us who we are and how does that change as we get older?

When it comes to new diagnostics and treatments for cancer, researchers across the world are gaining traction.

A giant, grinning inflatable Sparky marked the spot Thursday morning on a soon-to-be-bustling-with-construction dirt lot where Arizona State University and Mayo Clinic broke ground on the new Healt

Arizona State University representatives from across campuses attended a symposium April 17–18 in Phoenix to gain insight into the veteran space, network with local and military veteran community l

Editor's note: This story first appeared in the spring 2019 issue of Impact magazine, which is published twi

If one thing was clear Wednesday afternoon at the launch of the Arizona State University Edson College of Nursing and Health Innovation’s

The shot clock reads 0:05 in Game 7. Two players — one in yellow, the other red — hurtle towards the edge of the court, hands outstretched, chasing the ball.

A third of all Americans have difficulty sleeping, and many of them turn to melatonin supplements to catch some Zs.

The advance of science is something like an explorer wandering through an uncharted jungle.

We know that our DNA can tell us a lot about ourselves, from susceptibility to certain cancer types to biological relationships.

The new hotel going up northwest of University Drive and Rural Road is part of a reimagining of the north part of the Arizona State University campus in Tempe that will draw corporate partners to t

Among the uninitiated, Phoenix might conjure less-than-savory thoughts of suburban sprawl, ecological challenges or a dearth of history.

As part of Arizona State University’s efforts to advance sustainability education for

Cindi SturtzSreetharan was driving her daughter home from school when her daughter asked, “Do you think my thighs look fat?” The child was 9 years old.

As the world struggles to meet the increasing demand for energy, coupled with the rising levels of CO2 in the atmosphere from deforestation and the use of fossil fuels, photosynthesis in nature sim

Arizona is among the leading states for job creation in construction, manufacturing and information technology, and population growth is expected to exceed 100,000 new residents this year.

Arizona State University School of Music education, performance and therapy areas recently joined forces with community partners Kyrene Aprende Middle School and Sunrise Senior Living Community to

What schools do Arizona’s highest-achieving high school seniors have their eyes on? Harvard? Yale? Princeton?

None of the above, and a little closer to home.

"Our culture is our biggest pride, and that pride will be our success."

Through their generous philanthropic investments, Leo and Annette Beus have already made a lasting ASU impact.

The NASA Psyche Mission is a journey to a unique metal world called Psyche, an asteroid orbiting the sun between Mars and Jupiter.

MyChoice, an internet-based decision aid that provides clear, unbiased information to Arizona State University student survivors of sexual assault, is scheduled for field testing during the 2019-20

Parkinson’s disease, a neurodegenerative disorder, largely affects movement and causes i

Arizona State University continues to create a more sustainable and resilient future — and not just during Earth Month.

It’s a typically gorgeous spring morning in Phoenix. Families paint color on a drab brick wall as others visit nearby booths and food trucks.

Easing the problem of homelessness will require communities to build more affordable housing, and that will require creating a new narrative with people who oppose it, according to two Arizona Stat

College students, professionals and high school students came together to learn, network and tackle community problems at the third annual SPARK conference in March.

During February and March, the Valley of the Sun YMCA in partnership with Arizona State University's Watts College of Public Service and Community Solutions hosted its inaugural Youth and Gov

The face you see in the mirror is the result of millions of years of evolution and reflects the most distinctive features that we use to identify and recognize each other, molded by our need to eat

A tiny piece of the building blocks from which comets formed has been discovered inside a primitive meteorite.

Glaciers melting. Record storms. Rising sea levels. Problems quite off the human scale.

What can little old you do about all of that?

In 2017, about 40,000 people died in car accidents, according to the National Safety Council. The vast majority of those accidents were caused by human error.

Arizona State University alumnus Dan Shilling considers himself a good example of somebody whose life was changed by the humanities.

Nearly 200 girls from Girl Scout troops and schools around the Phoenix metropolitan area stormed Arizona State University’s Tempe campus for GEAR Day on Saturday, March 30.

When you search online for “CTE and NFL,” you’ll find a list of 54 professional football players who have died and were diagnosed with the degenerative brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopath

With Tax Day right around the corner, many Americans are wondering how the changes brought about by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Ac

A woman who was told she could never have children as she stood there four months pregnant. A woman whose dog sold her out to the police as she hid in a tree.

Shawn served three years in prison for burglary, then walked out to face a dizzying array of requirements he had to fulfill with almost no help and no money.

What do you get when you combine computer science, physics, robotics and nanotechnology?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 1 in every 59 children in the U.S. is diagnosed with autism, up from 1 in every 150 in 2000.

Things it would be great to be able to see through: cargo trucks at ports. Burning homes. Buildings in hostile cities. Coatings on pills. Fog on dusty highways.

At-home DNA test kits are exploding in popularity.

The Arizona Legislature recently passed HB 2569, a bill that would loosen occupational licensing laws in the state by recognizing out-of-state

Hurricane Harvey made landfall on Aug. 25, 2017, then stalled over Texas for three days as a tropical storm.

In August 1970, a woman named Patricia Ann Parker filed a paternity suit against Elvis Presley in Los Angeles Superior Court.

It was a horrific crime: The villains tracked down mothers and their babies, killed the adults and trafficked the little ones all over the world.

From phone apps that measure light pollution to crowdsourced maps that track parasites, the process of collect

Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, 1777. At the end of a daylong battle, George Washington’s right flank has completely collapsed. British troops are closing in. 

An arrest in the decades-old Golden State Killer

This coming football season, the Arizona Cardinals will take social media breaks every 20 minutes during meetings.

America has lost the “owner’s manual” to democracy and must focus on restoring civics education to the next generation to reclaim it, according to a Harvard University professor and theorist.

Angelica Berner is one of 2019's new class of Brooke Owens Fellows.

On March 29, Arizona State University’s School of Politics and Global Studies hosted a daylong, nonpartisan training — called Elect Her — for women looking to ru

Once, wolves roamed free in great numbers across the deserts, arboreal forests, grasslands and Arctic tundra of the continental U.S.

Designer, inspirational author and trailblazer Cheryl Heller will create more new pathways in the next chapter of her career.

The success of illegal drug trafficking through wider and wider swaths of Central America is a consequence of law enforcement activity to curtail it, according to new research

Dale Snyder discovered her love of seashells while living on isolated beaches as a Navy wife in the 1970s.

Of the estimated more than 4 million dogs that end up in animal shelters each year, about half a million are euthanized.

Michele Clark studies invasive plant species, and her research could help save people from being attacked by tigers in a forest in Nepal.

From hip-hop to fashion and narrative art to indigenous urban pop culture: The seventh annual Phoenix Indian Center Youth

Beginning about 60,000 years ago, our species spread across the world occupying a wider range of habitats than any other species.

March

Sports is a microcosm of the racial and gender issues facing society, and it often serves as the vehicle for change, according to several experts who spoke at the second Global Sport Summit held by

Many of our so-called “smart” technologies don’t fit the strict definition of the word “autonomous” that is often used to describe them.

White supremacists, misogynists and alt-right groups have occupied space on the internet and social media channels for nearly a decade. 

Does instant access to huge amounts of information help or hinder how we determine what is real? What impact does social media have on how we distinguish truth from deception?

That plate of beautiful vegetables on your table is the result of a complicated matrix of farm labor, wages, costs and consumer prices.

“Space is compelling,” understated astronaut Cady Coleman at the end of her inaugural lecture at Arizona State University as the new

When Arizona State University alumna Elaissia Sears was sworn in as a justice of the peace for the West Mesa Justice Court this January, she marked milestones for herself and Arizona.

In the 1990s, theoretical physicist Klaus Lackner had an idea.

Editor's note: This piece was written by May Busch, senior adviser and executive in residence in ASU’s Office of the President.

Chris Wharton thinks television is a worse public health crisis than guns, and you can quote him on it.

Eleven cities, along a 2,400-mile stretch of the southern United States, united by Interstate 10 and water.

Too much of it, too little of it, and sometimes both.

When it comes to climate change and carbon reduction, Susanne Neuer is thinking small — extremely small.

To be an engineer, or not to be: That is the question.

People don’t go to the dentist for lots of reasons: fear, lack of insurance, reluctance to take too much time off work.

In schools and community centers across the country, Harry Boyte notices a need.

Sustainability shouldn’t only be taught within the walls of universities. It should also be an integral part of kindergarten through high school (K–12) curriculum.

The string of volcanoes in the Cascades Arc, ranging from California’s Mount Lassen in the south to Washington’s Mount Baker in the north, has been studied by geologists for well over a century.

Some say space is the final frontier. Michael Lawton, president and CEO of Barrow Neurological Institute, says it’s the human brain.

How a queen bee achieves her regal status that elevates her from her sterile worker sisters has been a long-standing question for scientists studying honey bees.

Momentum is beginning to shift toward addressing the effects of mass incarceration, and Arizona State University has several initiatives to address the growing concern over the fate of people in pr

A woman who overcame poverty and discrimination to reach prominence in the U.S. Army challenged students at Arizona State University to help their own communities.

The Watts College of Public Service and Community Solutions at Arizona State University is moving forward with a project to help revitalize a growing community of 230,000 residents in Phoenix.

A team of Arizona State University scientists has been using the latest space technology, combined with ground measurements, to assess the health of one of the nation’s most important sources of un

The central goal of nanotechnology is the manipulation of materials on an atomic or molecular scale, especially to build microscopic devices or structures.

With a growing global population, farmers are working hard to feed the world. Throw climate change into the mix and maintaining a thriving, high-yield farm becomes even harder.

One of ASU’s eight design aspirations is “social embeddedness,” defined as: ASU connects with communi

Arizona’s K–12 education system appears to be fairly straightforward at first glance. But it’s easy to get into the weeds when you start digging.

New research from a team at Arizona State University shows how, even when receiving a big rebate from the government, consumers won’t always behave in expected ways.

Recent political climates at home and abroad may leave many feeling increasingly insecure about the future of democracy.

Is space the final frontier for the benefit of all mankind — or possibly the world’s new battleground?

For the first time, a team of scientists has isolated and measured the weak force between protons and neutrons within the nucleus of an atom.

Mary Doyle and Karissa Greving Mehall, co-directors of the MAS-MFT program in Arizona State University’s T.

Have you heard the one about the aliens and the pyramids? Or what about the technologically advanced but tragically lost city of Atlantis?

In 2017, health care spending in the United States grew to $3.5 trillion, or nearly 18 percent of the country’s gross domestic product.

There are two narratives in climate change right now. One is the day-to-day drumbeat of news stories, usually a new scientific study, and usually put aside with the day’s second cup of coffee.

If everything had gone as originally conceived, the land at Fourth and McKinley streets in downtown Phoenix would be smack-dab in the middle of the Arizona Cardinals NFL football stadium complex.

African-American law enforcement officers must balance two identities simultaneously during these complicated times, and each identity serves the other, according to a panel discussion at Arizona S

Businesses are always striving to be better, faster and more efficient.

Biomolecules, such as DNA and proteins, are not static structures. They undergo complex conformational changes that are essential to their functioning and the signaling pathways they belong to.

Most often when we think of glass, we think of the panes in our windows and the dishes on our tables.

Law enforcement organizations across the United States have recently arrested

A $2.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education is funding a major collaboration to improve education.

Go West, young attorney.

For only the fourth time in the 38-year history of the Federalist Society National Student Symposium, it was held in the former territories and not the colonies.

Do you change the channel when you see an ad for the Gardasil vaccine?

At a time when technology shapes every facet of our lives, there’s a growing consensus that its role should be evaluated in a social context so that questions of impact and consequences are conside

Floods, fires, earthquakes and hurricanes.

Investigative reporters tend to see the world in a different way.

Arizona State University is spotlighting an issue that is rarely discussed in public or mentioned in the media: the romantic and sexual lives of people with disabilities.

Recently, at ASU Day at the Capitol, School of Politics and Global Studies alumna Ana Licona reflected on experie

It’s the Friday before spring break and tucked down the bustling hallway of the Sun Devil Fitness Complex are more than a dozen students from Arizona State University's College of

The School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment celebrated the achievements and service of a select group of alumni and community members during its annual 

"PBS NewsHour," the national nightly newscast known for its in-depth exploration of the day’s most critical issues, is opening a western news bureau at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and

Avid hikers know to be cautious of plants with leaves made up of three leaflets if they are red in the spring or fall.

The Force is strong not only in "Star Wars" lore but also as a fundamental property in physics.

By the time Berta Carbajal found herself in a conference room, shoulder-to-shoulder with state legislators, members of a city council and heads

A new Arizona State University study has found that boys whose parents were less involved and communicative with them during childhood were significantly more likely to carry a gun during their tee

Among the zoo of biomolecules essential to life, proteins are the most startlingly varied and versatile.

If you’ve ever wondered who to root for in a hypothetical battle between a giraffe and a fossil baboon, you’re not alone.

A measles outbreak that has affected 71 people in the state of Washington has drawn national attentio

February

What do tiny specks of silicon carbide stardust, found in meteorites and older than the solar system, have in common with pairs of aging stars prone to eruptions?

Editor's note: This story is part of an ASU Now series celebrating the centennial of

3D-printing technology is taking the world by storm.

Arizona now is a place for big dreams and aspirations, but we didn’t get here by wishing it, said Arizona State University President Michael M. Crow to a group of Valley leaders on Thursday.

Wellington “Duke” Reiter is committed to finding viable responses to urgent issues.

With the ease of digital publishing comes the Herculean effort of digital preservation.

Whether used to decipher an ancient culture or connect with the people around us, language is a cornerstone of societies around the world.

Researchers, scientists and other community experts are working together to disrupt dementia and end Alzheimer’s disease before losing another generation.

Sunlight passing through a glass prism makes a rainbow, but the rainbow colors we see are more than just red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet.

The World Health Organization is targeting neurological diseases as one of the greatest threats to public health.

Editor's note: This story is part of an ASU Now series celebrating the centennial of the Gr

Editor's note: This story is part of an ASU Now series celebrating the centennial of th

Editor's note: This story is part of an ASU Now series celebrating the centennial of the Gr

Editor's note: This story is part of an ASU Now series celebrating the centennial of the Gr

The Grand Canyon National Park turns 100 on Feb. 26, but the canyon's history goes back far beyond that.

Editor's note: This story is part of an ASU Now series celebrating the centennial of the Gr

Editor's note: This story is part of an ASU Now series celebrating the centennial of the Gr

Oxygen in the form of the oxygen molecule (O2), produced by plants and vital for animals, is thankfully abundant in Earth’s atmosphere and oceans.

The syncopated rat-a-tats and rhythmic dance moves of a traditional African drummer heralded the final weekend of Black History Month at the La Sala Ballroom on Arizona State University’s West camp

Growing up in East Los Angeles, Erika Camacho, an associate professor in the 

Researchers at Arizona State University, in partnership with collaborators at The University of Texas at Austin and Northern Arizona University, have announced $1.5 million in funding from the U.S.

An English master’s student, a business sophomore and an urban planning undergrad walk into a classroom. There is no punchline here, and they are all in the right place.

Boasting a bevy of Gila monsters, horny toads, chuckwallas and ring-tailed cats, the iconic Buckhorn Baths Motel in Mesa, Arizona, was once home to the state's largest taxidermy collection.

Everyone needs sleep, but that doesn’t mean it comes easy for everyone — especially when your natural sleep cycle is disrupted, throwing off your internal clock.

Arizona State University’s Assistant Professor Petr Sulc of the School of Molecular Sciences and the Biodesign Institute recently collaborated

A specialized program at ASU has trained nearly 200 students who have entered the workforce in careers that have a positive and profound impact on society.

Known for its palm trees, beautiful beaches and nearly perfect year-round weather, Hawaii is rightfully called paradise.

Arizona State University’s annual Day at the Capitol “is an opportunity for the legislators to spend some quality time learning about many of the things ASU is engaged in,” according to

Robert Cialdini’s work in fusing social psychology and marketing led to a new way of thinking about consumer behavior and launched a best-selling book.

A volunteer working with the NASA-led Backyard Worlds: Planet 9 project has found the oldest and coldest known white dwarf — an old Earth-sized remnant of a sun-like star that has died — ringed by

Arizona State University’s Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts is seeking seven individuals with field experience exploring arts, culture and design-based collaborations in the work of equi

Earlier this month, Arizona State University hosted the Geoscience Alliance, the nation's leading organization devoted to promoting geoscienc

David King, assistant professor in Arizona State University’s School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning,

Last chance.

The words jumped off the page.

When Keith Hjelmstad first arrived at Arizona State University in 2008, it was as university vice president and dean of the College of Technolo

Huan Liu has built a renowned research career in the areas of social computing, data mining and artificial intelligence by letting his doctoral

5G! 5G! 5G!

It’s coming! It’s the future! It’s going to be amazing! Smart everything!

Whoa, there. Simmer down. Let's take a look at what 5G actually means.

Disasters stop normal life dead in its tracks. Schools, stores and businesses shut down and wait it out.

Sometimes the best teachers are our peers. It was that mentality that inspired students from Arizona State University’s Ira A.

Ellie Perez, an alumna of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University, was born in Veracruz, Mexico.

Valentine’s Day is upon us, and that means chocolate.

Hispanic and Latino youth are more likely to drink alcohol at a younger age than their African-American and non-Hispanic Caucasian peers, but they are less likely to receive treatment for substance

“Who will you be in your future?”

Arizona State University researchers work all over the world from Antarctica to Mexico and Tucson to Pasadena, and a group of journalists and storytellers from the Cronkite School is following them

Fear. Anxiety. Hope. Desire. Love. Anger. Guilt. Grief. These are just a few of the emotions universal to our human experience.

Scientists from Arizona State University’s School of Molecular Sciences, in collaboration with colleagues from Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York Cit

Citing the startling advances in semiconductor technology of the time, Intel co-founder Gordon Moore in 1965 proposed that the number of transistors on a chip would double each year — the accuracy

Boris DeCourt was about 12 years old when he knew he would be committing his life to biomedical research.

"Animal House" and "Van Wilder" are fictional accounts of college, yet the role alcohol plays in these two film comedies is rooted in reality and can have consequences that are far from funny

Malachi Boni came to ASU’s RECHARGE conference looking for inspiration.

When Reyna Montoya first moved to Mesa, Arizona, in 2003, it was hard to feel at home.

U.S. Director of National Intelligence Daniel Coats released the 2019 National Intelligence Strategy in late January.

Honeybees frequently make international news, as their global decline threatens the world’s food supply.

Afrofuturism is a long-emerging art and cultural movement that views music, literature, films and television through a black lens.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for Americans, taking more lives each year than all cancers combined.

Arizona State University’s new location in downtown Mesa will train students in the transdisciplinary digital expertise that technology companies are now demanding, according to ASU President Micha

The public lecture Oxford Professor Jonathan Bate delivered Tuesday night at Changing Hands Bookstore in Phoenix, cheekily titled "T

Michelene Chi has tackled one of the thorniest problems in education: finding a way to get children to learn complex concepts.

Each year at Arizona State University’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, alumni, community members and other supporters cont

You could say Stewart Fotheringham is where he is now because of a dogged preoccupation with that perennial question of the human condition: Wh

Journalism, a profession with few minorities — and even fewer Native Americans — is now starting to see change.

Imagine a perfect day in metro Phoenix: no traffic congestion and autonomous vehicles glide commuters through the streets, hitting nothing but green lights.

Arizona State University Professor Donald L. Fixico doesn’t like surprises, especially when they involve a boss.

January

When we think of life on Earth, we might think of individual examples ranging from animals to bacteria.

On Thursday, President Donald Trump tweeted that Democrats are becoming the “party of late-term abortion.” The contentious issue took up much of an hourlong debate that evening between Judge Michae

A clever use of nonscience engineering data from NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has let a team of researchers, including an Arizona State University graduate student, measure the density of rock layer

In 2017, the United States spent $3.5 trillion on health. That’s 18 percent of the country’s GDP, and almost six times more than the budget of the U.S. Department of Defense.

When Di Bowman was making the move from Michigan to Arizona, she had found just the right home. But there was one flaw, and it was a deal-breaker.

On Thursday night, explorers gave a first report of a new land.

A packed house at Arizona State University heard the first details of the mission to study an asteroid beyond Mars.

The challenge of Alzheimer’s disease is hard for the patient, painful for the family and, in many ways, still baffling for researchers. 

As many as 30 to 50 percent of adults experienced abuse or neglect when they were children. Such abuse can lead to physical and mental health problems and even cognitive deficits in adulthood.

In an academic field where female researchers comprise a talented minority, two professors from Arizona State University's School of Molecular Sciences are making

An Arizona State University professor is challenging the long-held premise that obesity is the primary cause of many major weight-related health conditions and suggests focusing on healthy behavior

Pregnancy is no walk in the park: Women can suffer sudden weight gain, nausea, fatigue, headaches and mood swings.

Losing a local newspaper isn’t just a loss to the region — it’s a blow against grassroots democracy and can disturb the entire news ecosystem. 

Randee Huffman wasn't hanging out at the Arizona FIRST Lego League (aka AZ FLL) state championship tournament during the wee

For the thousands of Arizona youth currently in foster care, obtaining a college education is an achievement that may seem out of reach.

Wanting to lose weight or get the best deal are not the only influences on what people buy at the grocery store: Religious and moral beliefs also impact the food choices people make.

Oussama Khatib, a professor of computer science at Stanford University, encountered a pivotal moment during the first outing of his deep-sea robot,

Gaymon Bennett explores modernity’s role in contemporary religion and biotechnology. He says innovation requires soul work, which, in turn, requires one to embrace the shadow. 

If you’ve been looking for Arizona State University history major Scott Hilbrands at his usual haunts on the ASU Polytechnic campus this week, you’ll find him instead a few miles north — surrounded

Around 1,000 students, teachers and members of the community gathered on Wednesday, Jan. 23 to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Depending on who you ask, happiness can be a lot of things.

The Dalai Lama might tell you that happiness is the practice of compassion.

Your strengths are your weaknesses. Take more risks. And reach out to the margins of society.

That is how we can bring a deeply divided country back together again.

With the growth of e-commerce and other assets that can be earned through the internet, Indian Country is no longer bound to geographic borders.

Why does your co-worker drive a flashy car? Why do people make art? Are there any common threads in what makes people fall in love or feel happiness?

Steven Corman, a professor at the Hugh Downs School of Human Communication at Arizona State University, was honored with a Patriot Award in re

A person’s voice is their identity — and that can be expressed more profoundly through actions than words, according to an Arizona State University student who has dedicated his career to helping y

Americans have a constitutional right to a “speedy” trial, and new research by an Arizona State University professor has found that the concept of procedural timeliness is critical to employees as

Fitness goals are typically at the forefront of New Year’s resolutions for many Americans.

In the midst of the Sonoran Desert, a group of Arizona State University engineering students gather every Monday night after classes to untangle wires, size down battery pods with a metal file and

Investigative journalism is enjoying a new golden era thanks to new technologies, cutting-edge reporting techniques and expanding opportunities to hold powerful people accountable.

Knowing who needs to be where, on what day and at what time. Buying a bigger pair of pants before a child outgrows what is currently hanging in the closet.

Arizona State University’s Professor Giovanna Ghirlanda and Assistant Professor Matthias Heyden, both of the School of Molecular Sciences, and Associate Professor Sara Vaiana of the Department of P

Community-based care is ASU nursing Professor Gerri Lamb’s jam.

Researchers from Arizona State University, North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina have developed an intelligent system for “tuning” powered prosthetic knees, all

Arizona State University Professor Neal A.

Various studies estimate how long it takes for health research to go from the lab out into the world where it can do some good, with findings ranging anywhere from 10 to 17 years.

People who are severely injured in the upper extremities may experience nerve damage that impairs motor function from shoulder to hand.

He was a civil rights activist and academic.

The son of a Native American who taught at an all-black college.

For many years, there existed among scholars of the medieval and Renaissance periods the old chestnut that those were the times before the concept of race existed.

In 1982, after Melbourne man Graham Carrick had experienced 17 years of silence, the device implanted in his inner ear was switched on and sound miraculously flooded in.

When we think about robots, it’s usually in the context of their relationships with humans.

Fluvial landscapes and the availability of water are of paramount importance for human safety and socioeconomic growth.

Legionnaires’ disease, one of the deadliest waterborne diseases in the United States, is on the rise.  

For this installment of ASU Now’s "culture of pursuit" series, we interview Sarra Tekola, recent awardee of the highly competitive and distinguished Ford Foundation Fellowship. 

Oxygen is at the center of everything.

In his poem “Song of Myself,” Walt Whitman wrote: “I believe a leaf of grass is no less than the journey-work of the stars.”

The presidents of Arizona’s three state universities are hoping that the upcoming legislative session is when lawmakers will finally consider the “50/50” funding model they’ve been promoting for se

Imagine you operate an amusement park and you want to ensure your park is

As the second leading cause of death worldwide, cancer is a focal point in both clinical research and health care fields, but n

Everyone can be an explorer — that’s the goal of Arizona State University’s NASA-funded digital teaching network, “Infiniscope.” This project is beginning its

Everyone wants their boss to be smart, kind and caring — but new research by an Arizona State University professor theorizes that a CEO should not be too compassionate, especially during a crisis.

Pull carbon out of the air, make money from it and save the human race.

If a scientific finding cannot be replicated, can it be true?

Health care will continue to be in the national spotlight in 2019, as uncertainty lingers about the future of the Affordable Care Act.

Most of us think of cybersecurity and biology

Postpartum bleeding is the world’s leading cause of death for women during and after childbirth, and the third-leading cause in

In a new study, researchers at the Biodesign Institute explore a safe and simple treatment for one of the most devastating and perplexing afflictions: Alzheimer’s disease.

“ASU research has purpose and impact,” states one of the eight design aspirations of Arizona State University.

A prominent British biographer, broadcaster, eco-critic and Shakespearean is visiting Arizona State University this spring to elevate further the university’s already top-ranked humanities research

The World Health Organization estimates roughly 47 million people worldwide are currently living with dementia. By 2050, that number is expected to almost triple.

Nature has made extravagant use of a simple molecule — DNA, the floor plan of all earthly life.

Music or a painting that catches your breath and makes you see the world in a new way.

The expectation of constant availability due to our 21st-century, technology-driven lifestyles can be exhausting.

Each year, Arizona State University honors leaders in the community for their commitment

Jane Jackson was the first woman to receive her PhD in physics at Arizona State University. This month she celebrates 25 years working with ASU.

Arizona State University Assistant Professor Tiffany Bao won best paper for her collaborative research on cyberwarfare at the NSA’s sixth annual

Editor's note: This piece was written by May Busch, senior adviser and executive in residence in ASU’s Office of the President. She is also a professor of practice in the W. P.

2018

December

Matthew D.

Each year, millions of Americans commit to changing something in the New Year, like making better financial decisions, improving their fitness or simply enjoying life more.

Arizona State University announced this week the three finalist teams selected to represent the institution in a national pitch competition in January focused on addressing the needs of the middle

Gene-edited babies. In-home speakers that never stop recording. Social networks selling companies your personal … well, everything.

According to Andrew Ng, a pioneer in machine learning and co-founder of Google Brain, artificial intelligence will have a transformational impac

Editor’s note: Two Arizona State University online master’s programs are helping construction and engineering professionals advance their careers by b

Researchers across the country are looking for ways to successfully find the pieces to the biological puzzle of diseases like cancer and Alzheimer’s, as the demand for precise diagnosis and treatme

Editor’s note: Two Arizona State University online master’s programs are helping construction and engineering professionals advance their careers by bringing them up to speed o

The end of the year brings a bevy of holiday traditions; cooking, decorating, gift exchanges and family gatherings can create cherished memories.

Given the enormous attention recently trained on a Chinese

The electric atmosphere of the holiday season often shines a bright light on feelings of togetherness, intimacy and the state of coupledom in festive surroundings.

Arizona State University researchers continue to break solar cell efficiency records in an effort to harness the sun’s energy more economically as a renewable source for electricity.

The lifeblood of any nonprofit organization is its volunteers — those people who gladly donate their time for a cause that stirs their passion.

Just two years ago, 31 teenagers died by suicide in the East Valley. Teen suicide is not just localized to large cities like Phoenix; it is a problem throughout Arizona and nationally.

With the arrival of the holiday season, you’ve likely been bombarded with customized coupons and gift recommendations designed to steer you to products and services you’re most inclined to buy.

Microbes in, on and around the planet are said to outnumber the stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. The total number of viruses is expected to vastly exceed even that calculation.

Do you make resolutions every New Year's but find by February or March that those goals start to disappear from focus? You’re not alone.

Can you solve this cipher?

"tdehahrtmitehriiscm."

A key discovery on the birth of stars and unexpected conditions in the early universe

Arizona Supreme Court Justice John R.

Shawn Jordan took a risk five years ago with his proposal for a project he hoped would earn one of the most sought-after National Science Foundation awards granted to young academic researchers.

Arizona State University researchers Joshua LaBaer and Nathan Newman have been named Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors, the organization announced today.

Exciting new research in neuroscience highlights sex differences of the brain at all levels, from structure and function to nervous systems. It is now understood that sex is a significant biologica

On May 27, 2011, Jason Little, a 41-year-old real estate investor from Orlando, Florida, was in an accident. His SUV rolled over on the interstate, shattering the driver’s side window.

NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft, newly arrived at asteroid Bennu, has found strong spectral evidence that the asteroid's rocks have undergone interactions with water at some point in their history.

Space is daunting in its enormity and tantalizing in its mysteries, and missions to explore those mysteries are audacious and ambitious. They are also expensive.

Editor's note: This story is being highlighted in ASU Now's year in review. 

Imagine being guided through your next doctor’s visit using augmented reality and artificial intelligence.

Our Milky Way Galaxy has hundreds of billions of stars and is more than 100,000 light-years across. So how do you pick your favorite star?

You’re a human and you need food. What do you do?

By age 60, one in three American women have had a hysterectomy.

An international team of researchers led by Arizona State University planetary scientist David Williams has created the first global geological map of the dwarf planet Ceres.

Scientists have discovered a spider that, uncharacteristically for its kind, nurtures its young and produces a fluid with milk-like properties.

This past October saw the fourth-heaviest single rainfall in Phoenix history, right on the heels of a typically scorching summer.

In the late 1990s, the University of Pennsylvania had a problem: The neighborhood surrounding the university was unsafe.

In the summer of 2002, when Michael Crow became president of Arizona State Universit

Arizona State University research technician and Mars 2020 Mastcam-Z calibration engineer Andy Winhold waited patiently on the loading dock of ASU’s Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Buildin

Arizona’s next U.S. senator Kyrsten Sinema began her workweek by finishing her semester as a lecturer in the School of Social Work at Arizona State University.

Want to seriously reduce crime in your neighborhood? Throw a party and bring in the love.

The Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University has become one of the most highly acclaimed public law schools in the United States, in part by recruiting and supporting its inno

A new statewide survey of adolescents in Arizona finds alarmingly high rates of e-cigarette use as well as use of marijuana concentrates, and an Arizona State University professor who led the resea

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is funding a new Arizona State University initiative to provide in-depth health care news coverage about underserved communities across the Southwest.

Perceptive residents of downtown Phoenix may already be aware of the latest mural to crop up in the city’s ever-growing collection.

Think VR goggles are only for gamers? Think again.

November

In an article published online today in Science Advances, a team of scientists from Arizona State University's School of Molecular Sciences and Germany offer an e

Gregory Melikian feels strongly that communication is a key component for U.S relations overseas.

A team at Arizona State University has analyzed a huge data set from an online labor market and discovered that women earn less than men in technology work — primarily because of the women’s choice

By tracing the growth lines in adolescent Neanderthal teeth — which leave a record like tree rings — researchers gained fascinating insights into Neanderthal childhood.

Refugee camps. Disaster areas. Remote military outposts.

Former U.S. Rep.

Arizona’s economy is very strong, fueled by job creation and personal income gains — and that good news should last through 2019, according to Arizona State University’s economic outlook expert.

Social and behavioral science has a bias problem, argues Arizona State University Professor Daniel Hruschka in The Conversation.

Locusts have afflicted humanity throughout history, with devastating consequences. It’s no surprise that locusts are one of the 10 plagues in the biblical book Exodus.

There’s a big difference between a migrant, who’s primarily angling to enter the United States to make more money, and a refugee, who is fleeing political or religious persecution or violence.

Have more sex. Sleep alone. Drink less caffeine. Get more exercise. Turn off the electronics and dispense with all negative thoughts.

There are myriad health benefits to getting a good night’s sleep, but doing so isn’t always easy.

If you ever feel like you’re not mentally sharp when you’re exhausted, you’re probably right.

The Special Olympics Arizona board of directors named Jamie Heckerman the president and chief executive officer of the nonprofit this fall.

Despite significant advances in cancer research, the disease continues to exact a devastating toll.

Africa harbors the greatest diversity of large-bodied mammals today, though this was not always the case.

People with higher education levels and more positive attitudes about news can more easily spot fake headlines, according to a research report by the News Co/Lab at Arizona State University’s Walte

Not so long ago — in the grand scheme of history — humans were constantly on the move. Escaping predators. Hunting for their next meal. Migrating to a more hospitable region.

While the nation’s schools continue to struggle to retain teachers, many Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College alumni are finding reasons to stay, advancing their careers and finding joy in classrooms.

At ASU Preparatory Polytechnic STEM Academy, the K-8 charter school on ASU’s Polytechnic campus, their motto is “Work Hard. Be Kind.

Until humans can find a way to geoengineer ourselves out of the climate disaster we’ve created, we must rely on natural carbon sinks, such as oceans and forests, to suck carbon dioxide out of the a

Arizona just had the wettest October on record, but that doesn’t mean the drought is over. Likewise, a 63 percent voter turnout in the midterm election on Nov.

Each year, over 4 million dogs enter animal shelters in the United States.

At first glance, you might think Arizona State University grad student Abby Goff is in need of a sweater.

If you’ve been tempted lately to pull a Jughead and draw pupils on your closed eyelids to catch a few extra Z’s in your morning meetings, you’re not alone.

Halloween and its abundance of candy for most people signals a months-long slide into "I can eat whatever I want" and calories be damned until the New Year.

While you have been busy planning to consume turkey, watch football games and visit with family this Thursday, American businesses large and small have been busy plotting how to get you inside thei

For more than half a century, doctors have been administering two types of tests to identify kidney damage: one that measures levels of creatinine in the body, and one that looks at the rate of uri

Touchscreens repelling fingerprints, bandages inhibiting infection, home windows cleaning themselves, solar panels converting more sunlight to electricity — Zachary Holman is making ordinary surfac

The Arizona Chapter of the American Planning Association recently held their annual conference, during which members from Arizona State University’s School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planni

Arizona State University today announced the ASU Smart City Cloud Innovation Center (CIC) Powered by AWS, an initiative that focuses on building smarter communities in the Phoenix metropolitan area

Microplastics are a growing area of concern for researchers and the public, with much of the focus on plastics in our oceans.

When Billy Mills beat the pack on a muddy cinder track in the 1964 Olympics in Tokyo, it was one of the greatest upsets in sports history. 

While economic growth is likely to slow in 2019, Arizona is expected to rank among the top five states for job creation. Which local industries are booming?

Wildfires have a more damaging and lasting effect on poor and minority communities, according to a new study recently outlined in The New York Times.

It’s 27 hours and 14 minutes into a 40-hour 3D print job when the 3D printer hiccups and takes over your masterpiece/prototype/capstone project piece/replacement part that will save you $10,000.

During World War II, cartoons, posters and screwball comedies were just as deadly as panzers and Thunderbolts.

It’s official: Arizona is now a battleground state. This, according to Margie Omero, one half of the “The Pollsters” podcast duo rounded out by Kristen Soltis Anderson.

The near-term future of Earth is one of a warming planet, as urban expansion and greenhouse gas emissions stoke the effects of climate change. Current climate projections show that in U.S.

Genome engineering was the subject of the day as Arizona State University’s Biodesign Institute kicked off a new lecture series designed to bring science’s preeminent thought leaders to ASU.

Robots are increasingly at work on land, at sea, in the air and out in space.

Later this month some of the brightest minds in health care tech will be gathering at Arizona State University’s Downtown Phoenix campus for Hacking the Human: Digital Healthcare

Each year, there are some 13.3 million new cases of acute kidney injury (AKI), a serious affliction.

Military personnel are often thought of as strong, adaptable and resilient men and women who make great sacrifices to protect our country.

For veterans, their time in the military is often a significant part of their lives, and nobody is going to understand that service more than another veteran.

The U.S. Department of Energy has announced 36 projects that together have been awarded $80 million to support early-stage bioenergy research and development.

Where did Earth's global ocean come from?

NCAA college basketball rarely makes it to the far reaches of the Navajo Nation.

“Honey, where’s Mom?”

“Count to 10 and I’ll be there shortly.”

Arizona State University has a secret weapon: Distinguished military leaders who have served at the highest levels at home and abroad advise President Michael M.

Knots are indispensable tools for such human activities as sailing, fishing and rock climbing — not to mention tying shoes.

Thirty-five years ago, when doctors told Gina Johnson that her critically ill newborn son had Down syndrome, her world came crashing down.

Felipe Herrera is leading the way, not just for his family but also for other first-generation students at Arizona State University.

“Oh, I’d be interested in a course like that!”

There is a problem with the set of tools social scientists use to study human behavior.

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey signed an executive order on Oct.

Mitch Menchaca, a graduate student in Arizona State University's School of Community Resources and Development, will return this fall to Phoenix as the next executive director of the city of Phoeni

You’re making spaghetti for a dinner party, but you’ve forgotten mushrooms, onions and Parmesan. You need one of your friends to hit the store on their way over.

After taking a class on health advocacy in fall 2017, Catherine Daem, now a graduate of Arizona State University's College of Health Solutions, wanted to find a solution to the Valley's local food

The opportunity for students to vote on, or near, campus could be a major step to encouraging younger voters to get to the polls.

October

If you think that campaign ads for the Nov. 6 midterm election have gotten out of hand when it comes to bending the truth, you’re probably right.

Words do matter, especially to adolescents.

Ming Zhao thinks cloud computing should deliver computing power just as electric companies deliver electricity — like a utility.

Thanks to a $7 million grant recently awarded to Arizona State University, students and their families will have greater access to a college education and a foundation for a bright future.

Tempe Town Lake has been a part of the city's landscape for over 19 years, and Hilairy Hartnett's lab has been measuring and collecting data there for the past 13.

For many students, deciding where to attend school and what to study can take serious deliberation.

Originally, alumna Nikki Halle’s plan was to stay close to home and attend Michigan State with all of her friends.

Melanie Katzman was born curious and said she always planned to study psychology.

Matt Bell knows the importance of a sense of place.

Reduced federal marketing dollars, a shortened enrollment period and regularly scheduled website blackouts are just a few of the recent actions taken by the Trump administration that may discourage

Red-tailed hawks can live to be up to 20 years old.

Gloria Feldt has been at the forefront of women’s empowerment issues for decades, and she hopes women can move past the current #MeToo movement to include men in the conversation about gender equit

What causes some adolescents to thrive while other teenagers struggle with substance abuse and mental health?

It happens all too often each summer: Yet another litany of weekend shootings in Chicago appears in the news.

The game of baseball unfolds slowly, over nine innings and over the course of three hours or more — and yet it can reach a critical junction in a blink of an eye.

In a small office on the third floor of the Music Building — ASU Library archives’ temporary home during the

You know you need to get more exercise. You want to be healthier. More physically fit. Mentally sharper.

In 2000, duck hunters found the body of a young woman near the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Her remains were badly decomposed, but she had long hair.

After centuries of oppression and silenced voices, Emmy Award-winning journalist Norah O’Donnell predicts meaningful change is on the horizon for women around the world.

Scientists at Arizona State University are celebrating their recent success on the path to understanding what makes the fiber that spiders spin — weight for weight — at least five times as strong a

In addition to a full slate of candidates, Arizona voters will also consider five propositions on the ballot in the November 2018 general election.

Most archaeological fieldwork in the U.S. is federally mandated for historic preservation.

Dignity Health and Arizona State University have announced the 2018 awardees of the Collaborative Strategic Initiatives Program, which offers grants to ASU faculty and Dignity Health investig

In 1776, when members of the Second Continental Congress met at the Pennsylvania State House in Philadelphia to sign a document declaring the Thirteen Colonies’ independence from the Kingdom of Gre

With new technology, astronomers are entering a golden age, witnessing cosmological phenomena as never before.

One of the balancing acts faced by conservation agencies is how to conserve and protect as many species as possible from extinction with limited funding and finite resources.

New observations by two Arizona State University astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope have caught a red dwarf star in a violent outburst, or superflare.

A major earthquake that displaces a mass population of people. Widespread power outages that cascade through a metro area.

“And so it stays just on the edge of vision,/ A small unfocused blur, a standing chill/ That slows each impulse down to indecision./ Most things may never happen: this one will.”

At first glance, Down syndrome and Alzheimer’s disease, two severe brain abnormalities, may seem to have little in common.

Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict interim director John Carlson warned audience members at an event Tuesday evening on Arizona State University's Tempe campus that they’d better be havi

Last year almost 87,000 pounds of marijuana were sold to the nearly 153,000 Arizonans who carry medical cards legally allowing them to buy it (that equates to slightly more than half a pound each p

In the Maya city of Copán lies a crypt holding the remains of 16 jaguars and pumas.

Starting college is exciting and liberating, but sometimes it can be overwhelming or stressful. Many college students end up feeling depressed or anxious.

In 1855, an English photographer named Roger Fenton traveled to Crimea to document the war there.

More than 130 years ago, a small community of settlers in a remote northern Arizona valley erupted into a frenzy of ambushes, murders and massacres.

High school math teacher Andrew Strom felt thrilled when he was recruited for an eight-week stretch working with Arizona State University engineering researchers this past summer.

Cyberattacks make the headlines seemingly every week, with few untouched by the breaches. But there is positive news as researchers take aim at malicious hackers.

The gloom of Saturday’s rainstorm did nothing to dampen the spirit of the roughly 30 volunteers gathered at Sixth Street Park in Tempe for the first annual

Two Arizona State University professors are among the first recipients of Somatic Cell Genome Editing (SCGE) grants from the Nat

The 2002 landmark reporting of The Boston Globe that uncovered pervasive child sexual abuse at the hands of Catholic priests opened the veritable floodgates to a torrent of parallel accounts.

It was just a small detail: a logo on a shirt. 

When Paul LePore traveled to Virginia in April to participate in the Department of Defense’s oldest and most prestigious public outreach program, he walked away truly inspired by what he saw.

Having achieved his dream of working in the sports industry, a student at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University is helping local high schoolers do the same.

It’s a Tuesday afternoon, and on the third floor of the Arizona Center in downtown Phoenix, a group of second-year Mayo Clinic students are learning to walk — or perhaps more accurately, re-learnin

Thanks to social media, one inaccurate but catchy headline about research can find new life in unlimited shares and retweets, but the actual science can become dangerously distorted.

Why and when did humans begin to rely on culturally transmitted information? Does culture allow humans to adapt to a wide range of ecological habitats?

Mother Earth is living on borrowed time.

In April 2019, ASU will celebrate indigenous culture with the ASU Pow Wow and the premiere of a new theatrical experience, "Native Nation," both of which will honor spiritual legacy and be an oppor

Some days it feels like everything happens in the world of social media, but an Arizona State University professor has new research on how face-to-face conversations affect our opinions about produ

About 50 years ago, the first ant farms took off in popular culture, turning children into backyard scientists.

The law is a mystery to most people and can be a scary path to navigate.

Often it seems there is nowhere to turn — or it takes thousands of dollars to find the answer.

Understanding the relationship between Earth history and human evolution is an enduring challenge of broad scientific and public interest.

Rebecca J. Kinney, originally from Detroit, noticed a change in the way people talk about her hometown.

Discarded pizza boxes. Empty energy-drink cans. Dozens dancing. And hundreds of people cracking, hacking and tapping away on laptops during a 36-hour marathon binge.

How does Captain America’s shield remain virtually indestructible when subjected to the Hulk’s strength or Thor’s hammer?

Today millions of Americans are enjoying a day off work — a tip of the hat to Christopher Columbus, the man who history says discovered this country in 1492.

Meteorites tell us when the solar system was formed — approximately 4.6 billion years ago. But they can also tell us how.

In July 1670, observers on Earth witnessed a “new star,” or nova, in the constellation Cygnus.

Biologists know a lot about how life works, but they are still figuring out the big questions of why life exists, why it takes various shapes and sizes and how life is able to amazingly adapt to fi

The National Science Foundation has awarded a $1.5 million Smart and Connected Communities grant to a team of researchers at Arizona’s three public universities to develop a network that integrates

Connecting patients, caregivers and family members with resources and research is the goal behind an annual public conference hosted by the Arizona Al

Single-use plastics — such as cups with straws, takeout containers and water bottles — are so common in our culture of convenience that we often don’t give them a second thought.

Just after 6:30 p.m.

An international collaboration led by the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, or DESY, with participation from Arizona State University’s Biodesign Center for Applied Structural Discovery, the

Sometimes something sweet requires serious smarts.

September

In only its second year, the Young Engineers Shape the World program is exposing high school students in the Phoenix metro area to opportun

In the 19th century, the German chemist August Kekulé, while enjoying a fireside nap, dreamed of a snake swallowing its own tail to help him solve the elusive structure of the six-carbon compound b

The patio of the clubhouse at Encanto Park in Phoenix was an oasis of shade on a hot, sunny day earlier this week.

Arizona State University Associate Professor Craig A. Mertler is a man of action — and research.

The office shelves of Arizona State University scientists are usually lined with books related to their research.

Working for the benefit of our community is central to the mission of Arizona State University, but it’s actually a pretty radical idea, according to a professor who teaches students how to do it.

When the director of Arizona State University’s Energy Innovations Group takes the long view of his job, he’s looking at an investment in the future.

Someone else’s future.

From the horseshoe-shaped, glass-bottomed skywalk hovering 4,700 feet above the Grand Canyon floor to the highest dam in the Western Hemisphere towering 726 feet above the Colorado River, engineeri

It’s not easy being a kid, especially in middle school (sixth and seventh grade), when fitting in and finding place among your peers can be daunting.

Globalization is discussed often as a relatively new phenomenon, arising sometime after the spread of the internet.

Arizona State University and the city of Phoenix are paying tribute to the life and civic contributions of Sandra Day O’Connor on the anniversary of her swearing-in to the Supreme Court.

If you’re smart, you change your passwords every six months and avoid using “password123” to secure your information. That should be enough to protect you, right?

Baseball. It’s a common thread throughout the life of Arizona State University alumnus Judge Lawrence Anderson.

Six years ago, a doctor told Stephanie Cahill that she most likely wouldn’t graduate high school, and that college was definitely out of the question.

Ten years after the election of Barack Obama, the nation’s first African-American president, the United States is still walking a line between hope and hate.

If you’re like most 21st-century Americans, chances are you’ve crowdsourced what to do about a medical concern on social media — or worse, Googled it — and found yourself overwhelmed by the respons

Think about where you are right now. Your office chair, your living room couch, your spot of shady sidewalk. The land under your feet has a story to tell.

Between 25 and 30 percent of children under the age of 18 in the United Stat

Ivan Ermanoski slips his credit card from his wallet and places it on the table in front of him.

As the opioid epidemic in America rages on, many treatment facilities struggle to meet the health needs of freshly sober individuals, leaving them no option but to seek medical care outside the fac

Giving students a voice is one of the most radical ideas that a university can do to reform higher education.

Editor's note: This piece was written by May Busch, senior adviser and executive in residence in ASU’s Office of the President. She is also a professor of practice in the W. P.

It doesn’t take long to find a Phoenician who has a story or two about the years when downtown Phoenix pretty much went dark at 5:05 p.m. Sure, the arena and ballpark were there.

Every second, approximately 6,000 tweets are posted on Twitter. Every minute, 360,000 tweets. Every hour, almost 22 million tweets. Every day, more than 500 million tweets.

The mission of the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University started with the desire to replicate a single blade of grass.

For the sixth year in a row, middle-school and high-school students from across Arizona gathered at the Polytechnic campus for a two-day coding competition Sept. 12–13. 

Capturing a big, complex idea in 60 seconds is not easy.

Autumn means looking forward to the first crisp evenings and breaking out the cozy layers — elsewhere in the country, that is.

Stephen Krause has spent nearly 20 years tailoring his teaching style to fit his students’ needs.

One of the best ways to learn if you should study psychology in college is to go and experience psychology in action.

Sun Tzu, the general of ancient China, wrote in his enduring military treatise “The Art of War” of the importance of knowing one’s enemy.

Family is the most important thing to people who live in the Gila River Indian Community, and the houses they live in should reflect that reality.

Many people use Yelp to find a good place to eat or a trusted mechanic, but in a new study researchers delved deep into the popular online review site to better understand American child care from