News

2019

May

Some students major in the humanities; others take a humanities class just to check off a general credit.

The unseasonably temperate weather in the Phoenix metropolitan area this spring may have everyone scratching their heads, but rest assured, heat will always be a concern in the Valley whose name pa

Smiles on every face. Congratulations passed around left and right. Speakers saying they don’t want to speak for too long. Just another scene of another graduation in May.

The dry, arid climate of the Sonoran Desert has created harsh living conditions for several millennia.

For the third year, select Arizona State University faculty will spend their summer advancing research and understanding on a significant health challenge, in partnership with Mayo Clinic.

A mammal’s posture while moving, or locomotor posture, plays a key role in how variable the number of vertebrae in its spinal column can be across all members of that species, a team of researchers

According to the National Alliance to End Homelessness, 9,865 people experience homelessness on a given night in Arizona.

In the United States, obesity rates among children ages 2 to 19 years old have skyrocketed from 10% in 1999 to over 18.5% in 2

So you got a Fitbit for Christmas and you were psyched. New year, new me, you thought. Time to pump up the jams and get down to business.

One in four adults in the U.S.

On April 23 at 9:09 p.m.

The emerging field of nanotechnology has spurred many advances in energy, defense and medicine applications.

You are what you eat. But first, you are what your mother eats. And it wasn’t that long ago when no one blinked an eye at a pregnant woman sipping a cocktail.

Sarah Phillips, a student at the Watts College of Public Service and Community Solutions, knew Arizona State University was home from the minute she ste

Maintaining software is costly, and for developers like Facebook and Microsoft, repairing software bugs can be very expensive.

Who doesn’t love a garden? Turning the soil and planting seeds or seedlings just so, then watering and witnessing subtle, then significant growth over time.

Cancer is a protean disease, assuming many forms and disguises. Despite enormous strides in research in past decades, some cancers remain persistently lethal.

This spring marks the 35th anniversary of ASU’s Hispanic Mother-Daughter Program that aims to increase the number of first-ge

Ad spending broke records during the 2018 m

Power electronics are the middle step between the electrical grid and your electronic devices.

A toddler sat alone in the middle of a pile of toys, absorbed in stacking plastic blocks to form an unsteady tower.

“Eat healthier and exercise more.”

A bold proposal for the future of most of the nearly 2,000-mile stre

Wastewater treatment and reuse are critical to global health and sustaining a world population predicted to reach 10 billion by 2050.

History has shown that positive things can happen when individuals unite for the greater good.

The popular adage that men are from Mars and women are from Venus might seem an antiquated notion nowadays.

It doesn’t take special insight to recognize dog owners love their dogs. A lot.

In fall 2017, the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) camera on NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter took a series of images of the Martian moon Phobos.

FBI director Christopher Wray invites you to visit him in Washington, D.C., where you will share a spotlight with country crooner Dolly Parton: All in a day’s work?

Frank Smith III arrived at Arizona State University knowing what he planned to be when he grew up.

Brass, bronze and steel are metal alloys in which the combination of chemical elements — copper and zinc, copper and tin, iron and carbon, respectively — create unique properties, such as high stre

Arizona State University Associate Professor Heather Switzer and alumna Anastasia Todd are using the power of narrative to break the current fr

Scientists know that age and weight are risk factors in the development of cancer.

Meet Trilly: The black-and-tan, floppy-eared, 9-year-old Gordon setter may have just made medical history by receiving a shot that may contain the very first vaccine intended to prevent cancer.

Arizona State University empowers students to find their places, like the newsroom, the trading floor or the design studio.

In 2010, Tomas Robles found himself in Phoenix with an accounting job he didn’t love and what felt like a troubling political tide he was powerless to impact.

Fake news. Weaponized narratives. Agitprop.

It’s all chatter, until someone puts down the keyboard, picks up a gun and walks into a house of worship.

How do you fight that?

Artificial intelligence has made impressive strides.

Improving the quality of food for families in South Phoenix will likely require many changes, ranging from policy updates at the federal level to a stronger focus on culture at the family level, ac

The world’s top chess player isn’t a human or a computer, it’s a “centaur” — a hybrid chess-playing team composed of a human and a computer.

For Meli’sa Crawford, talking about poop isn’t gross or impolite — it’s an important part of a day’s work. Crawford is an Arizona State University PhD candidate who studies poop to lea

Luminosity at Arizona State University is where interdisciplinary teams of students with bright ideas dream big.

Early one spring evening in a bright green workout room at a YMCA in west Phoenix, a petite woman stands at the head of a group of parents and their children demonstrating jump squats.

Arizona’s economy is thriving and is likely to flourish at least for another year, according to economics experts at Arizona State University.

Two cosmochemists at Arizona State University have made the first-ever measurements of water contained in samples from the surface of an asteroid.

April

Crime is down in Arizona but more people are in prison, and confronting that issue will require a broad range of changes plus a lot of courage, according to a group discussion on criminal justice r

On a recent sunny Saturday at Arizona State University, the Tempe campus was buzzing with middle and high schoolers in lab coats and goggles, sprinting between buildings and labs.

Intensive investigations into the nature of cancer have given rise to innovative and unorthodox approaches to countering this deadly affliction.

No matter where you are in the United States, the food on your plate probably started its life in Fresno, California.

Arizona State University and Silicon Kingdom Holdings (SKH) have announced an agreement to deploy carbon-capture technology developed by Professor

When it comes to new diagnostics and treatments for cancer, researchers across the world are gaining traction.

What makes us who we are and how does that change as we get older?

Arizona State University representatives from across campuses attended a symposium April 17–18 in Phoenix to gain insight into the veteran space, network with local and military veteran community l

Editor's note: This story first appeared in the spring 2019 issue of Impact magazine, which is published twi

If one thing was clear Wednesday afternoon at the launch of the Arizona State University Edson College of Nursing and Health Innovation’s

A giant, grinning inflatable Sparky marked the spot Thursday morning on a soon-to-be-bustling-with-construction dirt lot where Arizona State University and Mayo Clinic broke ground on the new Healt

A third of all Americans have difficulty sleeping, and many of them turn to melatonin supplements to catch some Zs.

The shot clock reads 0:05 in Game 7. Two players — one in yellow, the other red — hurtle towards the edge of the court, hands outstretched, chasing the ball.

We know that our DNA can tell us a lot about ourselves, from susceptibility to certain cancer types to biological relationships.

The new hotel going up northwest of University Drive and Rural Road is part of a reimagining of the north part of the Arizona State University campus in Tempe that will draw corporate partners to t

Among the uninitiated, Phoenix might conjure less-than-savory thoughts of suburban sprawl, ecological challenges or a dearth of history.

The advance of science is something like an explorer wandering through an uncharted jungle.

Cindi SturtzSreetharan was driving her daughter home from school when her daughter asked, “Do you think my thighs look fat?” The child was 9 years old.

As the world struggles to meet the increasing demand for energy, coupled with the rising levels of CO2 in the atmosphere from deforestation and the use of fossil fuels, photosynthesis in nature sim

As part of Arizona State University’s efforts to advance sustainability education for

What schools do Arizona’s highest-achieving high school seniors have their eyes on? Harvard? Yale? Princeton?

None of the above, and a little closer to home.

"Our culture is our biggest pride, and that pride will be our success."

Arizona is among the leading states for job creation in construction, manufacturing and information technology, and population growth is expected to exceed 100,000 new residents this year.

Arizona State University School of Music education, performance and therapy areas recently joined forces with community partners Kyrene Aprende Middle School and Sunrise Senior Living Community to

The NASA Psyche Mission is a journey to a unique metal world called Psyche, an asteroid orbiting the sun between Mars and Jupiter.

MyChoice, an internet-based decision aid that provides clear, unbiased information to Arizona State University student survivors of sexual assault, is scheduled for field testing during the 2019-20

Through their generous philanthropic investments, Leo and Annette Beus have already made a lasting ASU impact.

Parkinson’s disease, a neurodegenerative disorder, largely affects movement and causes i

Arizona State University continues to create a more sustainable and resilient future — and not just during Earth Month.

It’s a typically gorgeous spring morning in Phoenix. Families paint color on a drab brick wall as others visit nearby booths and food trucks.

Easing the problem of homelessness will require communities to build more affordable housing, and that will require creating a new narrative with people who oppose it, according to two Arizona Stat

During February and March, the Valley of the Sun YMCA in partnership with Arizona State University's Watts College of Public Service and Community Solutions hosted its inaugural Youth and Gov

The face you see in the mirror is the result of millions of years of evolution and reflects the most distinctive features that we use to identify and recognize each other, molded by our need to eat

A tiny piece of the building blocks from which comets formed has been discovered inside a primitive meteorite.

College students, professionals and high school students came together to learn, network and tackle community problems at the third annual SPARK conference in March.

Arizona State University alumnus Dan Shilling considers himself a good example of somebody whose life was changed by the humanities.

Nearly 200 girls from Girl Scout troops and schools around the Phoenix metropolitan area stormed Arizona State University’s Tempe campus for GEAR Day on Saturday, March 30.

Glaciers melting. Record storms. Rising sea levels. Problems quite off the human scale.

What can little old you do about all of that?

In 2017, about 40,000 people died in car accidents, according to the National Safety Council. The vast majority of those accidents were caused by human error.

With Tax Day right around the corner, many Americans are wondering how the changes brought about by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Ac

A woman who was told she could never have children as she stood there four months pregnant. A woman whose dog sold her out to the police as she hid in a tree.

Shawn served three years in prison for burglary, then walked out to face a dizzying array of requirements he had to fulfill with almost no help and no money.

When you search online for “CTE and NFL,” you’ll find a list of 54 professional football players who have died and were diagnosed with the degenerative brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopath

Things it would be great to be able to see through: cargo trucks at ports. Burning homes. Buildings in hostile cities. Coatings on pills. Fog on dusty highways.

At-home DNA test kits are exploding in popularity.

The Arizona Legislature recently passed HB 2569, a bill that would loosen occupational licensing laws in the state by recognizing out-of-state

What do you get when you combine computer science, physics, robotics and nanotechnology?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 1 in every 59 children in the U.S. is diagnosed with autism, up from 1 in every 150 in 2000.

Hurricane Harvey made landfall on Aug. 25, 2017, then stalled over Texas for three days as a tropical storm.

It was a horrific crime: The villains tracked down mothers and their babies, killed the adults and trafficked the little ones all over the world.

From phone apps that measure light pollution to crowdsourced maps that track parasites, the process of collect

Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, 1777. At the end of a daylong battle, George Washington’s right flank has completely collapsed. British troops are closing in. 

An arrest in the decades-old Golden State Killer

In August 1970, a woman named Patricia Ann Parker filed a paternity suit against Elvis Presley in Los Angeles Superior Court.

Angelica Berner is one of 2019's new class of Brooke Owens Fellows.

This coming football season, the Arizona Cardinals will take social media breaks every 20 minutes during meetings.

America has lost the “owner’s manual” to democracy and must focus on restoring civics education to the next generation to reclaim it, according to a Harvard University professor and theorist.

Once, wolves roamed free in great numbers across the deserts, arboreal forests, grasslands and Arctic tundra of the continental U.S.

Designer, inspirational author and trailblazer Cheryl Heller will create more new pathways in the next chapter of her career.

On March 29, Arizona State University’s School of Politics and Global Studies hosted a daylong, nonpartisan training — called Elect Her — for women looking to ru

Dale Snyder discovered her love of seashells while living on isolated beaches as a Navy wife in the 1970s.

Of the estimated more than 4 million dogs that end up in animal shelters each year, about half a million are euthanized.

Michele Clark studies invasive plant species, and her research could help save people from being attacked by tigers in a forest in Nepal.

The success of illegal drug trafficking through wider and wider swaths of Central America is a consequence of law enforcement activity to curtail it, according to new research

Beginning about 60,000 years ago, our species spread across the world occupying a wider range of habitats than any other species.

From hip-hop to fashion and narrative art to indigenous urban pop culture: The seventh annual Phoenix Indian Center Youth

March

Sports is a microcosm of the racial and gender issues facing society, and it often serves as the vehicle for change, according to several experts who spoke at the second Global Sport Summit held by

Does instant access to huge amounts of information help or hinder how we determine what is real? What impact does social media have on how we distinguish truth from deception?

Many of our so-called “smart” technologies don’t fit the strict definition of the word “autonomous” that is often used to describe them.

White supremacists, misogynists and alt-right groups have occupied space on the internet and social media channels for nearly a decade. 

“Space is compelling,” understated astronaut Cady Coleman at the end of her inaugural lecture at Arizona State University as the new

When Arizona State University alumna Elaissia Sears was sworn in as a justice of the peace for the West Mesa Justice Court this January, she marked milestones for herself and Arizona.

That plate of beautiful vegetables on your table is the result of a complicated matrix of farm labor, wages, costs and consumer prices.

Editor's note: This piece was written by May Busch, senior adviser and executive in residence in ASU’s Office of the President.

Chris Wharton thinks television is a worse public health crisis than guns, and you can quote him on it.

Eleven cities, along a 2,400-mile stretch of the southern United States, united by Interstate 10 and water.

Too much of it, too little of it, and sometimes both.

When it comes to climate change and carbon reduction, Susanne Neuer is thinking small — extremely small.

In the 1990s, theoretical physicist Klaus Lackner had an idea.

People don’t go to the dentist for lots of reasons: fear, lack of insurance, reluctance to take too much time off work.

In schools and community centers across the country, Harry Boyte notices a need.

To be an engineer, or not to be: That is the question.

The string of volcanoes in the Cascades Arc, ranging from California’s Mount Lassen in the south to Washington’s Mount Baker in the north, has been studied by geologists for well over a century.

Sustainability shouldn’t only be taught within the walls of universities. It should also be an integral part of kindergarten through high school (K–12) curriculum.

Some say space is the final frontier. Michael Lawton, president and CEO of Barrow Neurological Institute, says it’s the human brain.

How a queen bee achieves her regal status that elevates her from her sterile worker sisters has been a long-standing question for scientists studying honey bees.

Momentum is beginning to shift toward addressing the effects of mass incarceration, and Arizona State University has several initiatives to address the growing concern over the fate of people in pr

The Watts College of Public Service and Community Solutions at Arizona State University is moving forward with a project to help revitalize a growing community of 230,000 residents in Phoenix.

A woman who overcame poverty and discrimination to reach prominence in the U.S. Army challenged students at Arizona State University to help their own communities.

The central goal of nanotechnology is the manipulation of materials on an atomic or molecular scale, especially to build microscopic devices or structures.

A team of Arizona State University scientists has been using the latest space technology, combined with ground measurements, to assess the health of one of the nation’s most important sources of un

Arizona’s K–12 education system appears to be fairly straightforward at first glance. But it’s easy to get into the weeds when you start digging.

New research from a team at Arizona State University shows how, even when receiving a big rebate from the government, consumers won’t always behave in expected ways.

With a growing global population, farmers are working hard to feed the world. Throw climate change into the mix and maintaining a thriving, high-yield farm becomes even harder.

One of ASU’s eight design aspirations is “social embeddedness,” defined as: ASU connects with communi

Is space the final frontier for the benefit of all mankind — or possibly the world’s new battleground?

For the first time, a team of scientists has isolated and measured the weak force between protons and neutrons within the nucleus of an atom.

Recent political climates at home and abroad may leave many feeling increasingly insecure about the future of democracy.

In 2017, health care spending in the United States grew to $3.5 trillion, or nearly 18 percent of the country’s gross domestic product.

There are two narratives in climate change right now. One is the day-to-day drumbeat of news stories, usually a new scientific study, and usually put aside with the day’s second cup of coffee.

If everything had gone as originally conceived, the land at Fourth and McKinley streets in downtown Phoenix would be smack-dab in the middle of the Arizona Cardinals NFL football stadium complex.

African-American law enforcement officers must balance two identities simultaneously during these complicated times, and each identity serves the other, according to a panel discussion at Arizona S

Mary Doyle and Karissa Greving Mehall, co-directors of the MAS-MFT program in Arizona State University’s T.

Have you heard the one about the aliens and the pyramids? Or what about the technologically advanced but tragically lost city of Atlantis?

Biomolecules, such as DNA and proteins, are not static structures. They undergo complex conformational changes that are essential to their functioning and the signaling pathways they belong to.

Most often when we think of glass, we think of the panes in our windows and the dishes on our tables.

Law enforcement organizations across the United States have recently arrested

A $2.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education is funding a major collaboration to improve education.

Go West, young attorney.

For only the fourth time in the 38-year history of the Federalist Society National Student Symposium, it was held in the former territories and not the colonies.

Businesses are always striving to be better, faster and more efficient.

Do you change the channel when you see an ad for the Gardasil vaccine?

Floods, fires, earthquakes and hurricanes.

Investigative reporters tend to see the world in a different way.

At a time when technology shapes every facet of our lives, there’s a growing consensus that its role should be evaluated in a social context so that questions of impact and consequences are conside

Arizona State University is spotlighting an issue that is rarely discussed in public or mentioned in the media: the romantic and sexual lives of people with disabilities.

Recently, at ASU Day at the Capitol, School of Politics and Global Studies alumna Ana Licona reflected on experie

It’s the Friday before spring break and tucked down the bustling hallway of the Sun Devil Fitness Complex are more than a dozen students from Arizona State University's College of

The School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment celebrated the achievements and service of a select group of alumni and community members during its annual 

Avid hikers know to be cautious of plants with leaves made up of three leaflets if they are red in the spring or fall.

"PBS NewsHour," the national nightly newscast known for its in-depth exploration of the day’s most critical issues, is opening a western news bureau at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and

By the time Berta Carbajal found herself in a conference room, shoulder-to-shoulder with state legislators, members of a city council and heads

The Force is strong not only in "Star Wars" lore but also as a fundamental property in physics.

A new Arizona State University study has found that boys whose parents were less involved and communicative with them during childhood were significantly more likely to carry a gun during their tee

Among the zoo of biomolecules essential to life, proteins are the most startlingly varied and versatile.

If you’ve ever wondered who to root for in a hypothetical battle between a giraffe and a fossil baboon, you’re not alone.

A measles outbreak that has affected 71 people in the state of Washington has drawn national attentio

February

3D-printing technology is taking the world by storm.

Arizona now is a place for big dreams and aspirations, but we didn’t get here by wishing it, said Arizona State University President Michael M. Crow to a group of Valley leaders on Thursday.

What do tiny specks of silicon carbide stardust, found in meteorites and older than the solar system, have in common with pairs of aging stars prone to eruptions?

Editor's note: This story is part of an ASU Now series celebrating the centennial of

With the ease of digital publishing comes the Herculean effort of digital preservation.

Whether used to decipher an ancient culture or connect with the people around us, language is a cornerstone of societies around the world.

Wellington “Duke” Reiter is committed to finding viable responses to urgent issues.

Sunlight passing through a glass prism makes a rainbow, but the rainbow colors we see are more than just red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet.

The World Health Organization is targeting neurological diseases as one of the greatest threats to public health.

Researchers, scientists and other community experts are working together to disrupt dementia and end Alzheimer’s disease before losing another generation.

Editor's note: This story is part of an ASU Now series celebrating the centennial of the Gr

Editor's note: This story is part of an ASU Now series celebrating the centennial of the Gr

The Grand Canyon National Park turns 100 on Feb. 26, but the canyon's history goes back far beyond that.

Editor's note: This story is part of an ASU Now series celebrating the centennial of the Gr

Editor's note: This story is part of an ASU Now series celebrating the centennial of the Gr

Oxygen in the form of the oxygen molecule (O2), produced by plants and vital for animals, is thankfully abundant in Earth’s atmosphere and oceans.

Editor's note: This story is part of an ASU Now series celebrating the centennial of the Gr

Editor's note: This story is part of an ASU Now series celebrating the centennial of th

The syncopated rat-a-tats and rhythmic dance moves of a traditional African drummer heralded the final weekend of Black History Month at the La Sala Ballroom on Arizona State University’s West camp

Researchers at Arizona State University, in partnership with collaborators at The University of Texas at Austin and Northern Arizona University, have announced $1.5 million in funding from the U.S.

An English master’s student, a business sophomore and an urban planning undergrad walk into a classroom. There is no punchline here, and they are all in the right place.

Boasting a bevy of Gila monsters, horny toads, chuckwallas and ring-tailed cats, the iconic Buckhorn Baths Motel in Mesa, Arizona, was once home to the state's largest taxidermy collection.

Growing up in East Los Angeles, Erika Camacho, an associate professor in the 

Arizona State University’s Assistant Professor Petr Sulc of the School of Molecular Sciences and the Biodesign Institute recently collaborated

A specialized program at ASU has trained nearly 200 students who have entered the workforce in careers that have a positive and profound impact on society.

Known for its palm trees, beautiful beaches and nearly perfect year-round weather, Hawaii is rightfully called paradise.

Everyone needs sleep, but that doesn’t mean it comes easy for everyone — especially when your natural sleep cycle is disrupted, throwing off your internal clock.

Robert Cialdini’s work in fusing social psychology and marketing led to a new way of thinking about consumer behavior and launched a best-selling book.

A volunteer working with the NASA-led Backyard Worlds: Planet 9 project has found the oldest and coldest known white dwarf — an old Earth-sized remnant of a sun-like star that has died — ringed by

Arizona State University’s annual Day at the Capitol “is an opportunity for the legislators to spend some quality time learning about many of the things ASU is engaged in,” according to

Earlier this month, Arizona State University hosted the Geoscience Alliance, the nation's leading organization devoted to promoting geoscienc

David King, assistant professor in Arizona State University’s School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning,

Arizona State University’s Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts is seeking seven individuals with field experience exploring arts, culture and design-based collaborations in the work of equi

When Keith Hjelmstad first arrived at Arizona State University in 2008, it was as university vice president and dean of the College of Technolo

Last chance.

The words jumped off the page.

Disasters stop normal life dead in its tracks. Schools, stores and businesses shut down and wait it out.

Sometimes the best teachers are our peers. It was that mentality that inspired students from Arizona State University’s Ira A.

Huan Liu has built a renowned research career in the areas of social computing, data mining and artificial intelligence by letting his doctoral

5G! 5G! 5G!

It’s coming! It’s the future! It’s going to be amazing! Smart everything!

Whoa, there. Simmer down. Let's take a look at what 5G actually means.

Valentine’s Day is upon us, and that means chocolate.

Ellie Perez, an alumna of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University, was born in Veracruz, Mexico.

Hispanic and Latino youth are more likely to drink alcohol at a younger age than their African-American and non-Hispanic Caucasian peers, but they are less likely to receive treatment for substance

“Who will you be in your future?”

Scientists from Arizona State University’s School of Molecular Sciences, in collaboration with colleagues from Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York Cit

Citing the startling advances in semiconductor technology of the time, Intel co-founder Gordon Moore in 1965 proposed that the number of transistors on a chip would double each year — the accuracy

Arizona State University researchers work all over the world from Antarctica to Mexico and Tucson to Pasadena, and a group of journalists and storytellers from the Cronkite School is following them

Fear. Anxiety. Hope. Desire. Love. Anger. Guilt. Grief. These are just a few of the emotions universal to our human experience.

"Animal House" and "Van Wilder" are fictional accounts of college, yet the role alcohol plays in these two film comedies is rooted in reality and can have consequences that are far from funny

Malachi Boni came to ASU’s RECHARGE conference looking for inspiration.

Boris DeCourt was about 12 years old when he knew he would be committing his life to biomedical research.

Honeybees frequently make international news, as their global decline threatens the world’s food supply.

Afrofuturism is a long-emerging art and cultural movement that views music, literature, films and television through a black lens.

When Reyna Montoya first moved to Mesa, Arizona, in 2003, it was hard to feel at home.

U.S. Director of National Intelligence Daniel Coats released the 2019 National Intelligence Strategy in late January.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for Americans, taking more lives each year than all cancers combined.

The public lecture Oxford Professor Jonathan Bate delivered Tuesday night at Changing Hands Bookstore in Phoenix, cheekily titled "T

Michelene Chi has tackled one of the thorniest problems in education: finding a way to get children to learn complex concepts.

Arizona State University’s new location in downtown Mesa will train students in the transdisciplinary digital expertise that technology companies are now demanding, according to ASU President Micha

You could say Stewart Fotheringham is where he is now because of a dogged preoccupation with that perennial question of the human condition: Wh

Journalism, a profession with few minorities — and even fewer Native Americans — is now starting to see change.

Each year at Arizona State University’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, alumni, community members and other supporters cont

Imagine a perfect day in metro Phoenix: no traffic congestion and autonomous vehicles glide commuters through the streets, hitting nothing but green lights.

Arizona State University Professor Donald L. Fixico doesn’t like surprises, especially when they involve a boss.

January

In 2017, the United States spent $3.5 trillion on health. That’s 18 percent of the country’s GDP, and almost six times more than the budget of the U.S. Department of Defense.

When Di Bowman was making the move from Michigan to Arizona, she had found just the right home. But there was one flaw, and it was a deal-breaker.

On Thursday night, explorers gave a first report of a new land.

A packed house at Arizona State University heard the first details of the mission to study an asteroid beyond Mars.

When we think of life on Earth, we might think of individual examples ranging from animals to bacteria.

On Thursday, President Donald Trump tweeted that Democrats are becoming the “party of late-term abortion.” The contentious issue took up much of an hourlong debate that evening between Judge Michae

A clever use of nonscience engineering data from NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has let a team of researchers, including an Arizona State University graduate student, measure the density of rock layer

The challenge of Alzheimer’s disease is hard for the patient, painful for the family and, in many ways, still baffling for researchers. 

As many as 30 to 50 percent of adults experienced abuse or neglect when they were children. Such abuse can lead to physical and mental health problems and even cognitive deficits in adulthood.

An Arizona State University professor is challenging the long-held premise that obesity is the primary cause of many major weight-related health conditions and suggests focusing on healthy behavior

In an academic field where female researchers comprise a talented minority, two professors from Arizona State University's School of Molecular Sciences are making

For the thousands of Arizona youth currently in foster care, obtaining a college education is an achievement that may seem out of reach.

Wanting to lose weight or get the best deal are not the only influences on what people buy at the grocery store: Religious and moral beliefs also impact the food choices people make.

Pregnancy is no walk in the park: Women can suffer sudden weight gain, nausea, fatigue, headaches and mood swings.

Losing a local newspaper isn’t just a loss to the region — it’s a blow against grassroots democracy and can disturb the entire news ecosystem. 

Randee Huffman wasn't hanging out at the Arizona FIRST Lego League (aka AZ FLL) state championship tournament during the wee

Oussama Khatib, a professor of computer science at Stanford University, encountered a pivotal moment during the first outing of his deep-sea robot,

If you’ve been looking for Arizona State University history major Scott Hilbrands at his usual haunts on the ASU Polytechnic campus this week, you’ll find him instead a few miles north — surrounded

Around 1,000 students, teachers and members of the community gathered on Wednesday, Jan. 23 to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Depending on who you ask, happiness can be a lot of things.

The Dalai Lama might tell you that happiness is the practice of compassion.

Gaymon Bennett explores modernity’s role in contemporary religion and biotechnology. He says innovation requires soul work, which, in turn, requires one to embrace the shadow. 

Steven Corman, a professor at the Hugh Downs School of Human Communication at Arizona State University, was honored with a Patriot Award in re

A person’s voice is their identity — and that can be expressed more profoundly through actions than words, according to an Arizona State University student who has dedicated his career to helping y

Your strengths are your weaknesses. Take more risks. And reach out to the margins of society.

That is how we can bring a deeply divided country back together again.

With the growth of e-commerce and other assets that can be earned through the internet, Indian Country is no longer bound to geographic borders.

Why does your co-worker drive a flashy car? Why do people make art? Are there any common threads in what makes people fall in love or feel happiness?

Fitness goals are typically at the forefront of New Year’s resolutions for many Americans.

In the midst of the Sonoran Desert, a group of Arizona State University engineering students gather every Monday night after classes to untangle wires, size down battery pods with a metal file and

Investigative journalism is enjoying a new golden era thanks to new technologies, cutting-edge reporting techniques and expanding opportunities to hold powerful people accountable.

Americans have a constitutional right to a “speedy” trial, and new research by an Arizona State University professor has found that the concept of procedural timeliness is critical to employees as

Arizona State University’s Professor Giovanna Ghirlanda and Assistant Professor Matthias Heyden, both of the School of Molecular Sciences, and Associate Professor Sara Vaiana of the Department of P

Community-based care is ASU nursing Professor Gerri Lamb’s jam.

Knowing who needs to be where, on what day and at what time. Buying a bigger pair of pants before a child outgrows what is currently hanging in the closet.

Researchers from Arizona State University, North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina have developed an intelligent system for “tuning” powered prosthetic knees, all

Arizona State University Professor Neal A.

Various studies estimate how long it takes for health research to go from the lab out into the world where it can do some good, with findings ranging anywhere from 10 to 17 years.

For many years, there existed among scholars of the medieval and Renaissance periods the old chestnut that those were the times before the concept of race existed.

People who are severely injured in the upper extremities may experience nerve damage that impairs motor function from shoulder to hand.

He was a civil rights activist and academic.

The son of a Native American who taught at an all-black college.

When we think about robots, it’s usually in the context of their relationships with humans.

Fluvial landscapes and the availability of water are of paramount importance for human safety and socioeconomic growth.

In 1982, after Melbourne man Graham Carrick had experienced 17 years of silence, the device implanted in his inner ear was switched on and sound miraculously flooded in.

Legionnaires’ disease, one of the deadliest waterborne diseases in the United States, is on the rise.  

For this installment of ASU Now’s "culture of pursuit" series, we interview Sarra Tekola, recent awardee of the highly competitive and distinguished Ford Foundation Fellowship. 

The presidents of Arizona’s three state universities are hoping that the upcoming legislative session is when lawmakers will finally consider the “50/50” funding model they’ve been promoting for se

Oxygen is at the center of everything.

In his poem “Song of Myself,” Walt Whitman wrote: “I believe a leaf of grass is no less than the journey-work of the stars.”

Everyone wants their boss to be smart, kind and caring — but new research by an Arizona State University professor theorizes that a CEO should not be too compassionate, especially during a crisis.

Pull carbon out of the air, make money from it and save the human race.

Imagine you operate an amusement park and you want to ensure your park is

As the second leading cause of death worldwide, cancer is a focal point in both clinical research and health care fields, but n

Everyone can be an explorer — that’s the goal of Arizona State University’s NASA-funded digital teaching network, “Infiniscope.” This project is beginning its

Health care will continue to be in the national spotlight in 2019, as uncertainty lingers about the future of the Affordable Care Act.

Most of us think of cybersecurity and biology

Postpartum bleeding is the world’s leading cause of death for women during and after childbirth, and the third-leading cause in

If a scientific finding cannot be replicated, can it be true?

In a new study, researchers at the Biodesign Institute explore a safe and simple treatment for one of the most devastating and perplexing afflictions: Alzheimer’s disease.

A prominent British biographer, broadcaster, eco-critic and Shakespearean is visiting Arizona State University this spring to elevate further the university’s already top-ranked humanities research

“ASU research has purpose and impact,” states one of the eight design aspirations of Arizona State University.

The World Health Organization estimates roughly 47 million people worldwide are currently living with dementia. By 2050, that number is expected to almost triple.

Nature has made extravagant use of a simple molecule — DNA, the floor plan of all earthly life.

The expectation of constant availability due to our 21st-century, technology-driven lifestyles can be exhausting.

Music or a painting that catches your breath and makes you see the world in a new way.

Jane Jackson was the first woman to receive her PhD in physics at Arizona State University. This month she celebrates 25 years working with ASU.

Arizona State University Assistant Professor Tiffany Bao won best paper for her collaborative research on cyberwarfare at the NSA’s sixth annual

Each year, Arizona State University honors leaders in the community for their commitment

Editor's note: This piece was written by May Busch, senior adviser and executive in residence in ASU’s Office of the President. She is also a professor of practice in the W. P.

2018

December

Matthew D.

Gene-edited babies. In-home speakers that never stop recording. Social networks selling companies your personal … well, everything.

Each year, millions of Americans commit to changing something in the New Year, like making better financial decisions, improving their fitness or simply enjoying life more.

Arizona State University announced this week the three finalist teams selected to represent the institution in a national pitch competition in January focused on addressing the needs of the middle

According to Andrew Ng, a pioneer in machine learning and co-founder of Google Brain, artificial intelligence will have a transformational impac

Researchers across the country are looking for ways to successfully find the pieces to the biological puzzle of diseases like cancer and Alzheimer’s, as the demand for precise diagnosis and treatme

Editor’s note: Two Arizona State University online master’s programs are helping construction and engineering professionals advance their careers by bringing them up to speed o

Editor’s note: Two Arizona State University online master’s programs are helping construction and engineering professionals advance their careers by b

The electric atmosphere of the holiday season often shines a bright light on feelings of togetherness, intimacy and the state of coupledom in festive surroundings.

The end of the year brings a bevy of holiday traditions; cooking, decorating, gift exchanges and family gatherings can create cherished memories.

Given the enormous attention recently trained on a Chinese

Arizona State University researchers continue to break solar cell efficiency records in an effort to harness the sun’s energy more economically as a renewable source for electricity.

With the arrival of the holiday season, you’ve likely been bombarded with customized coupons and gift recommendations designed to steer you to products and services you’re most inclined to buy.

Microbes in, on and around the planet are said to outnumber the stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. The total number of viruses is expected to vastly exceed even that calculation.

The lifeblood of any nonprofit organization is its volunteers — those people who gladly donate their time for a cause that stirs their passion.

Just two years ago, 31 teenagers died by suicide in the East Valley. Teen suicide is not just localized to large cities like Phoenix; it is a problem throughout Arizona and nationally.

Can you solve this cipher?

"tdehahrtmitehriiscm."

Do you make resolutions every New Year's but find by February or March that those goals start to disappear from focus? You’re not alone.

A key discovery on the birth of stars and unexpected conditions in the early universe

Arizona Supreme Court Justice John R.

Shawn Jordan took a risk five years ago with his proposal for a project he hoped would earn one of the most sought-after National Science Foundation awards granted to young academic researchers.

Arizona State University researchers Joshua LaBaer and Nathan Newman have been named Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors, the organization announced today.

On May 27, 2011, Jason Little, a 41-year-old real estate investor from Orlando, Florida, was in an accident. His SUV rolled over on the interstate, shattering the driver’s side window.

NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft, newly arrived at asteroid Bennu, has found strong spectral evidence that the asteroid's rocks have undergone interactions with water at some point in their history.

Space is daunting in its enormity and tantalizing in its mysteries, and missions to explore those mysteries are audacious and ambitious. They are also expensive.

Exciting new research in neuroscience highlights sex differences of the brain at all levels, from structure and function to nervous systems. It is now understood that sex is a significant biologica

Editor's note: This story is being highlighted in ASU Now's year in review. 

Imagine being guided through your next doctor’s visit using augmented reality and artificial intelligence.

You’re a human and you need food. What do you do?

By age 60, one in three American women have had a hysterectomy.

An international team of researchers led by Arizona State University planetary scientist David Williams has created the first global geological map of the dwarf planet Ceres.

Scientists have discovered a spider that, uncharacteristically for its kind, nurtures its young and produces a fluid with milk-like properties.

Our Milky Way Galaxy has hundreds of billions of stars and is more than 100,000 light-years across. So how do you pick your favorite star?

This past October saw the fourth-heaviest single rainfall in Phoenix history, right on the heels of a typically scorching summer.

In the late 1990s, the University of Pennsylvania had a problem: The neighborhood surrounding the university was unsafe.

Arizona State University research technician and Mars 2020 Mastcam-Z calibration engineer Andy Winhold waited patiently on the loading dock of ASU’s Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Buildin

Arizona’s next U.S. senator Kyrsten Sinema began her workweek by finishing her semester as a lecturer in the School of Social Work at Arizona State University.

In the summer of 2002, when Michael Crow became president of Arizona State Universit

A new statewide survey of adolescents in Arizona finds alarmingly high rates of e-cigarette use as well as use of marijuana concentrates, and an Arizona State University professor who led the resea

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is funding a new Arizona State University initiative to provide in-depth health care news coverage about underserved communities across the Southwest.

Perceptive residents of downtown Phoenix may already be aware of the latest mural to crop up in the city’s ever-growing collection.

Want to seriously reduce crime in your neighborhood? Throw a party and bring in the love.

The Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University has become one of the most highly acclaimed public law schools in the United States, in part by recruiting and supporting its inno

Think VR goggles are only for gamers? Think again.

November

In an article published online today in Science Advances, a team of scientists from Arizona State University's School of Molecular Sciences and Germany offer an e

A team at Arizona State University has analyzed a huge data set from an online labor market and discovered that women earn less than men in technology work — primarily because of the women’s choice

Gregory Melikian feels strongly that communication is a key component for U.S relations overseas.

Former U.S. Rep.

Arizona’s economy is very strong, fueled by job creation and personal income gains — and that good news should last through 2019, according to Arizona State University’s economic outlook expert.

Social and behavioral science has a bias problem, argues Arizona State University Professor Daniel Hruschka in The Conversation.

By tracing the growth lines in adolescent Neanderthal teeth — which leave a record like tree rings — researchers gained fascinating insights into Neanderthal childhood.

Refugee camps. Disaster areas. Remote military outposts.

Have more sex. Sleep alone. Drink less caffeine. Get more exercise. Turn off the electronics and dispense with all negative thoughts.

There are myriad health benefits to getting a good night’s sleep, but doing so isn’t always easy.

If you ever feel like you’re not mentally sharp when you’re exhausted, you’re probably right.

Locusts have afflicted humanity throughout history, with devastating consequences. It’s no surprise that locusts are one of the 10 plagues in the biblical book Exodus.

There’s a big difference between a migrant, who’s primarily angling to enter the United States to make more money, and a refugee, who is fleeing political or religious persecution or violence.

The Special Olympics Arizona board of directors named Jamie Heckerman the president and chief executive officer of the nonprofit this fall.

Despite significant advances in cancer research, the disease continues to exact a devastating toll.

Africa harbors the greatest diversity of large-bodied mammals today, though this was not always the case.

Not so long ago — in the grand scheme of history — humans were constantly on the move. Escaping predators. Hunting for their next meal. Migrating to a more hospitable region.

People with higher education levels and more positive attitudes about news can more easily spot fake headlines, according to a research report by the News Co/Lab at Arizona State University’s Walte

At ASU Preparatory Polytechnic STEM Academy, the K-8 charter school on ASU’s Polytechnic campus, their motto is “Work Hard. Be Kind.

While the nation’s schools continue to struggle to retain teachers, many Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College alumni are finding reasons to stay, advancing their careers and finding joy in classrooms.

Each year, over 4 million dogs enter animal shelters in the United States.

At first glance, you might think Arizona State University grad student Abby Goff is in need of a sweater.

If you’ve been tempted lately to pull a Jughead and draw pupils on your closed eyelids to catch a few extra Z’s in your morning meetings, you’re not alone.

Halloween and its abundance of candy for most people signals a months-long slide into "I can eat whatever I want" and calories be damned until the New Year.

Until humans can find a way to geoengineer ourselves out of the climate disaster we’ve created, we must rely on natural carbon sinks, such as oceans and forests, to suck carbon dioxide out of the a

Arizona just had the wettest October on record, but that doesn’t mean the drought is over. Likewise, a 63 percent voter turnout in the midterm election on Nov.

For more than half a century, doctors have been administering two types of tests to identify kidney damage: one that measures levels of creatinine in the body, and one that looks at the rate of uri

Touchscreens repelling fingerprints, bandages inhibiting infection, home windows cleaning themselves, solar panels converting more sunlight to electricity — Zachary Holman is making ordinary surfac

The Arizona Chapter of the American Planning Association recently held their annual conference, during which members from Arizona State University’s School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planni

While you have been busy planning to consume turkey, watch football games and visit with family this Thursday, American businesses large and small have been busy plotting how to get you inside thei

Microplastics are a growing area of concern for researchers and the public, with much of the focus on plastics in our oceans.

When Billy Mills beat the pack on a muddy cinder track in the 1964 Olympics in Tokyo, it was one of the greatest upsets in sports history. 

While economic growth is likely to slow in 2019, Arizona is expected to rank among the top five states for job creation. Which local industries are booming?

Arizona State University today announced the ASU Smart City Cloud Innovation Center (CIC) Powered by AWS, an initiative that focuses on building smarter communities in the Phoenix metropolitan area

During World War II, cartoons, posters and screwball comedies were just as deadly as panzers and Thunderbolts.

Wildfires have a more damaging and lasting effect on poor and minority communities, according to a new study recently outlined in The New York Times.

It’s 27 hours and 14 minutes into a 40-hour 3D print job when the 3D printer hiccups and takes over your masterpiece/prototype/capstone project piece/replacement part that will save you $10,000.

It’s official: Arizona is now a battleground state. This, according to Margie Omero, one half of the “The Pollsters” podcast duo rounded out by Kristen Soltis Anderson.

The near-term future of Earth is one of a warming planet, as urban expansion and greenhouse gas emissions stoke the effects of climate change. Current climate projections show that in U.S.

Genome engineering was the subject of the day as Arizona State University’s Biodesign Institute kicked off a new lecture series designed to bring science’s preeminent thought leaders to ASU.

Later this month some of the brightest minds in health care tech will be gathering at Arizona State University’s Downtown Phoenix campus for Hacking the Human: Digital Healthcare

Each year, there are some 13.3 million new cases of acute kidney injury (AKI), a serious affliction.

Robots are increasingly at work on land, at sea, in the air and out in space.

The U.S. Department of Energy has announced 36 projects that together have been awarded $80 million to support early-stage bioenergy research and development.

Where did Earth's global ocean come from?

NCAA college basketball rarely makes it to the far reaches of the Navajo Nation.

“Honey, where’s Mom?”

“Count to 10 and I’ll be there shortly.”

Military personnel are often thought of as strong, adaptable and resilient men and women who make great sacrifices to protect our country.

For veterans, their time in the military is often a significant part of their lives, and nobody is going to understand that service more than another veteran.

Arizona State University has a secret weapon: Distinguished military leaders who have served at the highest levels at home and abroad advise President Michael M.

Knots are indispensable tools for such human activities as sailing, fishing and rock climbing — not to mention tying shoes.

Felipe Herrera is leading the way, not just for his family but also for other first-generation students at Arizona State University.

“Oh, I’d be interested in a course like that!”

There is a problem with the set of tools social scientists use to study human behavior.

Thirty-five years ago, when doctors told Gina Johnson that her critically ill newborn son had Down syndrome, her world came crashing down.

Mitch Menchaca, a graduate student in Arizona State University's School of Community Resources and Development, will return this fall to Phoenix as the next executive director of the city of Phoeni

You’re making spaghetti for a dinner party, but you’ve forgotten mushrooms, onions and Parmesan. You need one of your friends to hit the store on their way over.

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey signed an executive order on Oct.

After taking a class on health advocacy in fall 2017, Catherine Daem, now a graduate of Arizona State University's College of Health Solutions, wanted to find a solution to the Valley's local food

The opportunity for students to vote on, or near, campus could be a major step to encouraging younger voters to get to the polls.

October

If you think that campaign ads for the Nov. 6 midterm election have gotten out of hand when it comes to bending the truth, you’re probably right.

Ming Zhao thinks cloud computing should deliver computing power just as electric companies deliver electricity — like a utility.

Thanks to a $7 million grant recently awarded to Arizona State University, students and their families will have greater access to a college education and a foundation for a bright future.

Tempe Town Lake has been a part of the city's landscape for over 19 years, and Hilairy Hartnett's lab has been measuring and collecting data there for the past 13.

Words do matter, especially to adolescents.

Melanie Katzman was born curious and said she always planned to study psychology.

Matt Bell knows the importance of a sense of place.

For many students, deciding where to attend school and what to study can take serious deliberation.

Originally, alumna Nikki Halle’s plan was to stay close to home and attend Michigan State with all of her friends.

Red-tailed hawks can live to be up to 20 years old.

Reduced federal marketing dollars, a shortened enrollment period and regularly scheduled website blackouts are just a few of the recent actions taken by the Trump administration that may discourage

Gloria Feldt has been at the forefront of women’s empowerment issues for decades, and she hopes women can move past the current #MeToo movement to include men in the conversation about gender equit

What causes some adolescents to thrive while other teenagers struggle with substance abuse and mental health?

In a small office on the third floor of the Music Building — ASU Library archives’ temporary home during the

It happens all too often each summer: Yet another litany of weekend shootings in Chicago appears in the news.

The game of baseball unfolds slowly, over nine innings and over the course of three hours or more — and yet it can reach a critical junction in a blink of an eye.

In 2000, duck hunters found the body of a young woman near the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Her remains were badly decomposed, but she had long hair.

After centuries of oppression and silenced voices, Emmy Award-winning journalist Norah O’Donnell predicts meaningful change is on the horizon for women around the world.

You know you need to get more exercise. You want to be healthier. More physically fit. Mentally sharper.

Scientists at Arizona State University are celebrating their recent success on the path to understanding what makes the fiber that spiders spin — weight for weight — at least five times as strong a

In addition to a full slate of candidates, Arizona voters will also consider five propositions on the ballot in the November 2018 general election.

With new technology, astronomers are entering a golden age, witnessing cosmological phenomena as never before.

Most archaeological fieldwork in the U.S. is federally mandated for historic preservation.

Dignity Health and Arizona State University have announced the 2018 awardees of the Collaborative Strategic Initiatives Program, which offers grants to ASU faculty and Dignity Health investig

In 1776, when members of the Second Continental Congress met at the Pennsylvania State House in Philadelphia to sign a document declaring the Thirteen Colonies’ independence from the Kingdom of Gre

New observations by two Arizona State University astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope have caught a red dwarf star in a violent outburst, or superflare.

A major earthquake that displaces a mass population of people. Widespread power outages that cascade through a metro area.

“And so it stays just on the edge of vision,/ A small unfocused blur, a standing chill/ That slows each impulse down to indecision./ Most things may never happen: this one will.”

One of the balancing acts faced by conservation agencies is how to conserve and protect as many species as possible from extinction with limited funding and finite resources.

Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict interim director John Carlson warned audience members at an event Tuesday evening on Arizona State University's Tempe campus that they’d better be havi

Last year almost 87,000 pounds of marijuana were sold to the nearly 153,000 Arizonans who carry medical cards legally allowing them to buy it (that equates to slightly more than half a pound each p

At first glance, Down syndrome and Alzheimer’s disease, two severe brain abnormalities, may seem to have little in common.

In the Maya city of Copán lies a crypt holding the remains of 16 jaguars and pumas.

Starting college is exciting and liberating, but sometimes it can be overwhelming or stressful. Many college students end up feeling depressed or anxious.

In 1855, an English photographer named Roger Fenton traveled to Crimea to document the war there.

High school math teacher Andrew Strom felt thrilled when he was recruited for an eight-week stretch working with Arizona State University engineering researchers this past summer.

Cyberattacks make the headlines seemingly every week, with few untouched by the breaches. But there is positive news as researchers take aim at malicious hackers.

More than 130 years ago, a small community of settlers in a remote northern Arizona valley erupted into a frenzy of ambushes, murders and massacres.

The gloom of Saturday’s rainstorm did nothing to dampen the spirit of the roughly 30 volunteers gathered at Sixth Street Park in Tempe for the first annual

The 2002 landmark reporting of The Boston Globe that uncovered pervasive child sexual abuse at the hands of Catholic priests opened the veritable floodgates to a torrent of parallel accounts.

It was just a small detail: a logo on a shirt. 

When Paul LePore traveled to Virginia in April to participate in the Department of Defense’s oldest and most prestigious public outreach program, he walked away truly inspired by what he saw.

Having achieved his dream of working in the sports industry, a student at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University is helping local high schoolers do the same.

Two Arizona State University professors are among the first recipients of Somatic Cell Genome Editing (SCGE) grants from the Nat

It’s a Tuesday afternoon, and on the third floor of the Arizona Center in downtown Phoenix, a group of second-year Mayo Clinic students are learning to walk — or perhaps more accurately, re-learnin

Thanks to social media, one inaccurate but catchy headline about research can find new life in unlimited shares and retweets, but the actual science can become dangerously distorted.

Mother Earth is living on borrowed time.

Why and when did humans begin to rely on culturally transmitted information? Does culture allow humans to adapt to a wide range of ecological habitats?

About 50 years ago, the first ant farms took off in popular culture, turning children into backyard scientists.

The law is a mystery to most people and can be a scary path to navigate.

Often it seems there is nowhere to turn — or it takes thousands of dollars to find the answer.

In April 2019, ASU will celebrate indigenous culture with the ASU Pow Wow and the premiere of a new theatrical experience, "Native Nation," both of which will honor spiritual legacy and be an oppor

Some days it feels like everything happens in the world of social media, but an Arizona State University professor has new research on how face-to-face conversations affect our opinions about produ

Rebecca J. Kinney, originally from Detroit, noticed a change in the way people talk about her hometown.

Discarded pizza boxes. Empty energy-drink cans. Dozens dancing. And hundreds of people cracking, hacking and tapping away on laptops during a 36-hour marathon binge.

How does Captain America’s shield remain virtually indestructible when subjected to the Hulk’s strength or Thor’s hammer?

Understanding the relationship between Earth history and human evolution is an enduring challenge of broad scientific and public interest.

Today millions of Americans are enjoying a day off work — a tip of the hat to Christopher Columbus, the man who history says discovered this country in 1492.

In July 1670, observers on Earth witnessed a “new star,” or nova, in the constellation Cygnus.

Meteorites tell us when the solar system was formed — approximately 4.6 billion years ago. But they can also tell us how.

Biologists know a lot about how life works, but they are still figuring out the big questions of why life exists, why it takes various shapes and sizes and how life is able to amazingly adapt to fi

Connecting patients, caregivers and family members with resources and research is the goal behind an annual public conference hosted by the Arizona Al

Single-use plastics — such as cups with straws, takeout containers and water bottles — are so common in our culture of convenience that we often don’t give them a second thought.

Just after 6:30 p.m.

The National Science Foundation has awarded a $1.5 million Smart and Connected Communities grant to a team of researchers at Arizona’s three public universities to develop a network that integrates

An international collaboration led by the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, or DESY, with participation from Arizona State University’s Biodesign Center for Applied Structural Discovery, the

Sometimes something sweet requires serious smarts.

September

In only its second year, the Young Engineers Shape the World program is exposing high school students in the Phoenix metro area to opportun

The patio of the clubhouse at Encanto Park in Phoenix was an oasis of shade on a hot, sunny day earlier this week.

In the 19th century, the German chemist August Kekulé, while enjoying a fireside nap, dreamed of a snake swallowing its own tail to help him solve the elusive structure of the six-carbon compound b

Arizona State University Associate Professor Craig A. Mertler is a man of action — and research.

The office shelves of Arizona State University scientists are usually lined with books related to their research.

Working for the benefit of our community is central to the mission of Arizona State University, but it’s actually a pretty radical idea, according to a professor who teaches students how to do it.

From the horseshoe-shaped, glass-bottomed skywalk hovering 4,700 feet above the Grand Canyon floor to the highest dam in the Western Hemisphere towering 726 feet above the Colorado River, engineeri

When the director of Arizona State University’s Energy Innovations Group takes the long view of his job, he’s looking at an investment in the future.

Someone else’s future.

Arizona State University and the city of Phoenix are paying tribute to the life and civic contributions of Sandra Day O’Connor on the anniversary of her swearing-in to the Supreme Court.

It’s not easy being a kid, especially in middle school (sixth and seventh grade), when fitting in and finding place among your peers can be daunting.

Globalization is discussed often as a relatively new phenomenon, arising sometime after the spread of the internet.

Baseball. It’s a common thread throughout the life of Arizona State University alumnus Judge Lawrence Anderson.

Six years ago, a doctor told Stephanie Cahill that she most likely wouldn’t graduate high school, and that college was definitely out of the question.

If you’re smart, you change your passwords every six months and avoid using “password123” to secure your information. That should be enough to protect you, right?

Think about where you are right now. Your office chair, your living room couch, your spot of shady sidewalk. The land under your feet has a story to tell.

Between 25 and 30 percent of children under the age of 18 in the United Stat

Ten years after the election of Barack Obama, the nation’s first African-American president, the United States is still walking a line between hope and hate.

If you’re like most 21st-century Americans, chances are you’ve crowdsourced what to do about a medical concern on social media — or worse, Googled it — and found yourself overwhelmed by the respons

As the opioid epidemic in America rages on, many treatment facilities struggle to meet the health needs of freshly sober individuals, leaving them no option but to seek medical care outside the fac

Giving students a voice is one of the most radical ideas that a university can do to reform higher education.

Ivan Ermanoski slips his credit card from his wallet and places it on the table in front of him.

Every second, approximately 6,000 tweets are posted on Twitter. Every minute, 360,000 tweets. Every hour, almost 22 million tweets. Every day, more than 500 million tweets.

The mission of the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University started with the desire to replicate a single blade of grass.

Editor's note: This piece was written by May Busch, senior adviser and executive in residence in ASU’s Office of the President. She is also a professor of practice in the W. P.

It doesn’t take long to find a Phoenician who has a story or two about the years when downtown Phoenix pretty much went dark at 5:05 p.m. Sure, the arena and ballpark were there.

Capturing a big, complex idea in 60 seconds is not easy.

Autumn means looking forward to the first crisp evenings and breaking out the cozy layers — elsewhere in the country, that is.

Stephen Krause has spent nearly 20 years tailoring his teaching style to fit his students’ needs.

For the sixth year in a row, middle-school and high-school students from across Arizona gathered at the Polytechnic campus for a two-day coding competition Sept. 12–13. 

Family is the most important thing to people who live in the Gila River Indian Community, and the houses they live in should reflect that reality.

One of the best ways to learn if you should study psychology in college is to go and experience psychology in action.

Sun Tzu, the general of ancient China, wrote in his enduring military treatise “The Art of War” of the importance of knowing one’s enemy.

In 2004, Kraft introduced a line of 100-calorie mini packs of some of their most popular snack foods, launching a snacking revolution.

Social workers need to be on the front lines of imagining a world without oppression — the key to ending gender-based violence, according to experts at an Arizona State University conference

The Economic Club of Phoenix speaker series — hosted by the W. P.

Many people use Yelp to find a good place to eat or a trusted mechanic, but in a new study researchers delved deep into the popular online review site to better understand American child care from

When approximately 1,300 students began fall classes at Arizona State University's Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, most were well aware that they have access to some of

American democracy is eroding quickly, and it’s not being threatened by an outside force or another country.

New research by an Arizona State University professor shows that some methods of addressing security in schools may actually make students feel less safe.

Decades ago, oilmen had little interest in natural gas, the byproduct of crude extracted from the earth. So, they burned it off, like so many lit torches atop Texas’s oil fields.

When flying to Beijing, you’ll likely have to take multiple flights and pass through customs to get to your destination.

An Arizona State University research team has released new insights about intergranular stress-corrosion cracking (SCC), an environmental cause of premature failure in engineered structures, includ

Does your race make a difference in the quality of health care you receive? Is medical marijuana really as effective for pain relief as some people say?

Autonomous cars, 3D printing, blockchain technology: With so much emerging tech, how are we ever going to keep up with regulation? 

The top-down international development model used by donors, development agencies and policymakers needs rethinking.  Not only does it create aid dependence in communities, it often hi

A feature-length documentary has become a surprise hit at the box office and is renewing questions about adoption rights, privacy and related protections.

The Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals (APBP) announced the winners of its annual awards program to honor excellence in the profession.

President Donald Trump has launched a trade war over the last several months involving billions of dollars of goods and affecting the United States’ relationships with several countries, including

Umit Ogras veers easily back and forth from the pragmatic to the idealistic when he talks about his work and what he hopes it will make possible.

There are scores of saccharine quotes about friendship floating around — “Friends are the relatives we choose,” for example. (Really, the only one that resonates is “Friends help you move.

Imagine walking into your high school physics classroom only to be handed a surprise quiz on angular momentum.

Every day, black people have to navigate in “white spaces,” dispelling stereotypes and convincing everyone that they’re worthy.

August

It is nearly impossible to drive down a city street without seeing a car with a fuzzy pink mustache or sticker in the front window.

CRISPR has been heralded for some time for the possibilities it presents to harness and enhance the power of the human body to heal itself.

The granddaughter of a man who served as the warden of Angola, the Louisiana State Penitentiary sometimes referred to as “the Alcatraz of the South,” Leah Sarat sees the irony in helming a project

A first-generation college student and member of the LGBTQ community, Arizona State University junior David John Bier has never been one to let barriers hold him back.

Alzheimer’s disease is a devastating and progressive illness that affects almost 6 million Americans and their families.

Stories are a big part of sports: the underdog who triumphs with a last-second pass, the cursed team that finally wins the championship, the fan who swears by his lucky cap.

Smallpox, one of the most devastating diseases in human history, has ancient roots.

The International Union for Conservation of Nature World Commission on Protected Areas (IUCN-WCPA) recently issued new guidance to help ecologists assess ecosystem services within important sites f

Editor's note: Explicit verbal permission was given by Louise Wilson to publish photos depicting the Gitksan language.

During her undergrad years as a peer educator for her university’s sex ed program, Kelly Davis realized the power of statistics.

In 1999, when Americans watched as Michael J.

Editor's note: For additional in-depth coverage and commentary on the life of Sen. John McCain, please visit azpbs.org.

In 2012, Sen. John McCain donated his papers to Arizona State University. The archive, known simply as the McCain Collection, is expected to grow dramatically over the next few months.

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Death as a punishment is an ancient concept. It is also controversial. Worldwide, over 140 countries have outlawed the death penalty, yet in over 50 it remains the law of the land.

Arizona State University is helping to educate the next generation of hospice, palliative and dementia care professionals through a unique internship experience at Ho

Most neurons in the human brain live out their lives, enduring the processes of aging before eventually dying. Some, however, choose a more violent route: suicide.

This summer, more than 50 undergraduate students from across the nation studied in labs at Arizona State University to develop solutions to some of the world’s most vexing problems. 

Students in general biology classes usually don’t get to take blood samples from people, but an online class at Arizona State University not only lets students draw blood, they also can manipulate

Imagine meeting a potential roommate for coffee but instead of questions that gauge how compatible you both would be living together, you were asked about the ancestry of your parents’ families.

Leading local television news executives from across the country are at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication to take part in a new program designed

Researchers at Arizona State University and Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, have found that at least one type of blue clay may help fight disease-causing bacteria in wounds, including antibiot

According to Guide Dogs of America, a 16- to 18-month-old puppy will go through four to six months of training before it can become

Structures in nature are strong, lightweight and flexible. Using 3D printing allows engineers to replicate complicated, organic designs, such as honeycombs, for additive manufacturing.

Meteorites are totems of great power.

Arizona State University on Monday hosted the 2018 ASU Congressional Conference: Space Innovation at the Memorial Union on the Tempe campus. NASA officials, private space companies, scientists and

As a first-generation college graduate, Maria Anguiano has a deep personal understanding of the difference higher education can make in someone’s life.

Every year, about 45 million Americans rely on contact lenses to see the world more clearly. This $2.7 billion U.S. market has made contact lenses more comfortable and disposable.

The work of Abhishek Singharoy, assistant professor in Arizona State University's School of Molecular Sciences and member of the Biodesign Institute’s Center for Applied Structural Discovery, is fe

Often it’s not what you say, it’s what you understand that makes you a successful communicator.

A multidisciplinary group of Arizona State University faculty will spend the next two years researching and implementing new ways to improve services and reduce costs for some of Maricopa County’s

As rescue workers continue to search the rubble after last week's Morandi Bridge collapse killed at least 39 people in Genoa, Italy, the disaster has drawn attention to bridge safety and soundness

To say the town of Miami, Arizona, is small is an understatement — it covers less than a square mile with a population just under 2,000.

The first few years of a child’s life are crucial for learning language, and though scientists know the “when,” the “how” is still up for debate.

The Arizona State University Alumni Association has announced members of the ASU Leadership Institute’s inaug

There’s nothing like a good laugh to lighten a mood, especially when the atmosphere is serious — like it can be in a science classroom.

Adversity is part of life: Loved ones die. Soldiers deploy to war. Patients receive terminal diagnoses.

College is about new experiences — but it's also about traditions that link us to the past and future of the university.

Emily Brennan, a Barrett, The Honors College student majoring in biological sciences and anthropology, says her work with a student-led health-care organization has helped her see people experienci

Sheets, blankets, towels, laundry supplies, personal toiletries, maybe a bike and a printer — the cost of college life essentials can add up.

Arizona State University student Yessenia Acosta Terrazas was torn between becoming a teacher or an attorney, but participating in a new pilot program made up her mind. 

Recent and ongoing changes to U.S.

Recent observations by NASA's Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes of ultrahot Jupiter-like planets have perplexed theorists.

The ASU Preparatory Academy network has expanded into South Phoenix by merging with an existing charter school that was known already for its success.

If synthetic biology can “catch fire,” few areas of science and engineering could match it for having as dramatic an impact across such a broad a range of human needs.

The college experience is about stretching beyond your comfort zone to learn from new and sometimes challenging situations, shattering preconceived notions in the process.

In a move to advance high-quality enterprise journalism, the Scripps Howard Foundation today announced a $6 million investment into the creation of two centers for investigative journalism.

While advances in forensic science have helped convict many guilty people, the FBI is finding that in some instances the science has been overstated, leading to wrongful convictions.

Four years ago this summer, a phenomenon hit social media when millions of people participated in the "ALS Ice Bucket Challenge," raising more than $115 million for charity.

Stand aside, ketchup. Saturday, Aug. 4, is National Mustard Day.

Seems like journalists can’t count on many allies these days.

Scientists believe the solar system was formed some 4.6 billion years ago when a cloud of gas and dust collapsed under gravity, possibly triggered by a cataclysmic explosion from a nearby massive s

The double meaning of the title of the movie “Hidden Figures” remains a go-to for what was, is and could be for women and girls in science.

The summer monsoon in the deserts of the southwestern U.S. is known for bringing torrents of water, often filling dry stream beds and flooding urban streets.

Since Darwin first laid out the basic principles of evolution by means of natural selection, the role of competition for food as a driving force in shaping and shifting a species’ biology to outcom

A baby girl sits on the floor, crying. A man picks up the child and attempts to soothe her by patting her back and quietly singing in her ear. The baby sighs and stops crying.

July

For the first time ever, thousands of high-quality archival materials — photographs, documents and correspondence — chronicling the early history of Grand Canyon National Park (1890–1940) have been

For the past six years, first as an undergraduate and now as a doctoral student, Logan Mathesen has used industrial engineering to find solutions to big data problems.

New solar energy research from Arizona State University demonstrates that silicon-based tandem photovoltaic modules, which convert sunlight to electricity with higher efficiency than present module

With public health expenditure on the decline in the United States, Mac McCullough, an assistant professor in the College of Health Solutions at Arizona State University, set out to determine just

Each year, close to 700 million people are stricken with a viral infection that causes vomiting, diarrhea and stomach pain.

Water is vital for life.

But as our climate changes, the availability of water is also changing, leaving animals with limited or unreliable supplies of this critical resource.

Arizona State University played a major role in the first-ever Summit on the Research and Teaching of Young Adult Litera

Some civilizations build Gothic cathedrals, and some build huts.

Scotty, we need more power. Or, we need our tech to use less of it.

Challenges to our planet can overwhelmingly command the headlines: climate change, massive population increases, dwindling resources.

Brendon K. Colbert has been interested in the human immune system ever since his youngest brother was diagnosed with a large number of food allergies.

A new national survey shows that although nearly one in five Americans immediately associate the word “news” with the word “fake,” only a tiny number use that word to describe local news.

For the fourth year in a row, the ASU Foundation has announced the completion of a record year in fundraising for academic programs, research and initiat

It’s predicted to be 116 degrees in Tempe on Tuesday. Scorching.

The availability of water from underground aquifers is vital to the basic needs of more than 1.5 billion people worldwide, including those of us who live in the western United States.

For recent Arizona State University biomedical engineering graduate Lexi Bounds, it was an enthusiasm for soccer that unexpectedly led her to find a new passion in the sciences.

As legalized betting becomes a force in the sports world, fans will likely experience games in a different way — both in the arena and watching on TV, according to experts at Arizona State Universi

Scott Freitas has had a passion for building things and understanding how things work since he was young.

Each year, approximately 10–15 percent of postpartum women suffer from postpartum depression, which translates into almost 1 million women.

Using segments of DNA, researchers at ASU have constructed a pair of tweezers, measuring 100,000 times tinier than the width of a human hair.

Millennials account for nearly a third of the voting-age population in Arizona, and yet only 19 percent of the votes cast for president in 2016 were in that age group — leaving governing decisions

Diatoms are tiny, unicellular creatures, inhabiting oceans, lakes, rivers and soils.

A new study on ancient cultures in Peru has found the most effective growth strategy for leaders of some early city-states was

Matthew Lopez’s career as a molecular biologist stopped cold while he was a junior at the University of Colorado Boulder, which he attended in the late 1990s.

The lack of research in humanitarian settings magnifies natural and human-made disasters. An Arizona State University professor’s work aims to change that.

Defense contractor Raytheon had a $350,000 robot arm, used for smoothing the rough edges of metal, but it wasn't complete.

Editor's note: This is the final installment in a three-part series on energy research at ASU. The 

Arizona State University embraces the heat of the Sonoran Desert it calls home.

Macy’s has announced a data breach involving thousands of Macys.com and Bloomingdales.com customer cred

Editor's note: This is the second in a three-part series on energy research at ASU.

Most employees know that relationships with their co-workers are important, but it’s likely not many realize that they also think of their company as a person.

But they do.

As large swaths of the country grapple with drought, a new book looks to how to build resiliency in unsure times.

Editor's note: This is the first in a three-part series on energy research at ASU. The 

This is a story about timing.

Guns — few issues evoke as much passion and raw emotion from almost all corners of society. No matter what your opinion of them is, they are a defining part of what it means to be an American.

Two faculty members in Arizona State University’s Ira A.

The TRIO Talent Search program at Arizona State University launched in spring 2017 through a partnership with the

June

Researchers in Arizona State University’s Department of Psychology received a five-year grant for just under $2.5 million from the USDA to implement an intervention program that targets childhood o

As the summer temperatures continue to heat up, the most vulnerable citizens in our communities are at risk of succumbing to the ill effects of heat exposure.

Now that the spotlight is on her, Arizona State University student Victoria Hume wants to shift it in another direction.

The Arizona monsoon technically starts June 15 each year, but every desert dweller knows that it's July when the fireworks usually get going — and we're not talking the Uncle Sam variety.

Sally Kewayosh uses the short break in filming while students reposition their cameras to explain the 180-degree rule of cinematography, then instructs one of them to come in closer for a profile s

Like our oceans, today’s continents are brimming with life. Yet billions of years ago, before the advent of plants, continents would have appeared barren.

As Asteroid Day approaches on Saturday, don’t look up in fear — a dinosaur-killer only hits Earth once every 100 million years — but around in wonder.

Zika now has a cousin — the Keystone virus — and not everyone likes this new addition to the family.

Hurricane Harvey slammed into Texas last August as a Category 4 tropical storm, leaving a trail of death and devastation as catastrophic flooding swamped Houston and surrounding areas.

Matthew Scotch, associate professor of biomedical informatics at Arizona State University's College of Health Solutions and assistant director of the Biodesign Center for Environmental Health

Fossil records tell us that the first macroscopic animals appeared on Earth about 575 million years ago.

One day last April, Arizona State University biologist Matt Chew was leading his Novel Ecosystems class along the banks of the Gila River at the Tres Rios Wetlands.

Nighttime in Phoenix is getting hotter, and it’s not just Old Town Scottsdale's nightlife scene.

In a quiet courtroom, an attorney steps up to a lectern to deliver a closing argument.

More than 3,700 exoplanets (planets around other stars) have been discovered over the past 30 years.

The United States will never reclaim its position as the world’s top economic superpower unless more Hispanic people earn college degrees, according to Michael Crow, president of Arizona State Univ

Of the major illnesses facing humanity, Alzheimer’s disease (AD) remains among the most pitiless and confounding.

How do you create a school that is inclusive, collaborative and equitable?

An international team of researchers, including Alejandra Ortiz, a postdoctoral researcher with Arizona State University

In 1980, “infantile autism” was recognized as its own condition by the medical community.

Twenty high school students from across Arizona are at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication as part of an intensive, two-week media innovation trai

Anna Battle, an award-winning teacher, high school principal and school district administrator, will join ASU Preparatory Academy as chief leadership developm

American flag bunting, barbecues, Bomb Pops and John Philip Sousa: We all know the trappings of a great July Fourth celebration.

It’s remarkable choreography: In each of our bodies, more than 37 trillion cells tightly coordinate with other cells to organize into the numerous tissues and organs that make us tick.

Geologists have long thought that the central section of California's famed San Andreas Fault — from San Juan Bautista southward to Parkfield, a distance of about 90 miles — has a steady creeping m

A recent study named Arizona one of several “hot spots” in the nation for higher-than-average rates of nonmedical vaccination exemptions.

Juneteenth, a portmanteau of the words “June” and “nineteenth,” was born out of what was once referred to as the “peculiar institution” of the United States.

Prominent Arizona State University geotechnical engineer Edward Kavazanjian has earned the highest honor bestowed by the American Society of Civil Engineers on its members for their outstanding car

Research shows that the earlier kids are exposed to healthy lifestyle habits, the more likely they are to be healthy adults.

The internet loves creating villains: People get caught on camera or social media behaving badly, the post or video goes viral and anyone with a computer or smartphone piles on and fans the flames.

The Trump administration recently announced that the Medicare trust fund will be depleted by 2026 — three years earlier than previous estimates — and the Social Security trust fund will be exhauste

It used to be that the idea of stepping up school security meant the hiring of a school resource officer or simply educating the school population on facility entrances and exits in cases of emerge

School may be out for the semester, but for select faculty from Arizona State University's Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering and College of Health Solutions, summer is no time for a break.

In 2017, nearly 72,000 wildfires burned more than 10 million acres nationwide, according to the National Interagency Fire Center.

It cost $2.4 billion to fight them.

Dubbed by some as "the strangest star in the universe," the star known as KIC 8462852, Boyajian's Star, or Tabby's Star, is a little hotter than the sun and a bit brighter intrinsically.

The Intercontinental Exchange, which owns the New York Stock Exchange, has been developing an online trading platform that will allow large investors to buy and hold bitcoin.

The weather-related effects of climate change will affect the next phase of urban living. We just need to know how and when.

Cities across the nation are experiencing a revival thanks to architectural practices that infuse underutilized core spaces with innovative, mixed-use projects to attract and retain educated young

It’s a disclaimer that echoes passionately through the lecture halls of every beginning archaeology course: It’s not like the Indiana Jones movies!

Time seems to stand still during a cross-country flight, but then it flies while you're reading a good book.

Charlene Poola says her interest in social work started with her mother.

Could plants, fungi and animals provide information to scientists on preventing cancer in humans?

"Gonna be a hot one today," you think as you look out the kitchen window on a Saturday morning. The last thing you want to do is mow the lawn.

As Dorothy and the Scarecrow learned, sometimes nature talks back.

More than one-third of American adults and roughly 17 percent of children in the U.S.

We count on nurses for a lot of things — to be a calming presence, a helping hand, a source of knowledge.

As technology changes, so does the need for a workforce that can rapidly adapt to new ways of mining important research data. 

The figure of Robert F. Kennedy casts a long shadow, equally split between what was and what could have been. 

Half of the world’s stomachs, particularly in Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, depend heavily on one staple food crop: rice.

Each day in the United States, 116 people die from an opioid-related drug overdose. Opioid addiction has reach epidemic levels and is estimated to have cost the country $1 trillion since 2001.

Synthetic biology uses basic research about DNA and proteins to design and build “living nanotech” that controls cell behavior.

You’ve probably heard that every snowflake is different. Each snowflake’s unique pattern comes from the process by which water changes phases from liquid to solid.

Twelve years after graduating from high school, Stephen Houx had earned a lot of college credits before and after a five-year stint in the Marine Corps, but he was still working toward a degree.

The story of water in Arizona is as long and complex as the multibiomed state itself, but as it snakes its way through the years — from the Pima settling on the banks of the Gila River to Charles T

May

Getting a bunch of high school students to show up for a poetry reading on a Friday afternoon in the summer is quite a feat.

Starting college is exciting, but it also can be stressful, especially for minority students.

Medical and academic researchers are conducting the first major study in 20 years on firearm injuries and deaths of children and teens.

Arizona State University Department of Psychology undergraduate Ashley Thompson's to-do list probably looks different than her peers'.

Volcanic eruptions have a way of leaving people awestruck.

The Graduate College hosted its second annual Knowledge Mobilization Impact Awards highlighting impactful and innovative research conducted by ASU’s graduate students and postdoctoral scholars.

"Move it or lose it" is the old saying, but maybe it's time to flip that: Move it — because you have so much to gain.

If you have checked your email, visited a website or opened an app in the past few weeks, you've probably seen an updated privacy policy or terms of service agreement. What's going on? 

From humble roots in antiquity, the scientific method has come to dominate and transform modern society.

Just before Beatriz Mendoza graduated from Arizona State University a year ago, she joined her engineering classmates in figuring out where to apply for jobs.

The Tempe City Council announced Thursday that it will provide $35,000 from the Tempe Innovation Fund to embark on an anonymized monitoring system with Arizona State University scientists that will

A lot can happen at 160 degrees Fahrenheit: Eggs fry, salmonella bacteria dies, and human skin will suffer third-degree burns.

Memorial Day was once a day of solemn bereavement for fallen members of the United States military, but over the years, it has gotten lost in backyard barbecues, road trips and weekend radio countd

Hanghang Tong wants to help people as they go about their daily lives, do their jobs, interact with infrastructure and conduct research.

A U.S. Senate vote to turn back a Federal Communications Commission’s repeal of Obama-era net neutrality regulations was successful last week.

As humans, we know some of the factors that can cause cancer to develop in our bodies.

Xia Zhang, Arizona State University principal lecturer of Chinese, brings her multicultural and linguistic knowledge into the classrooms of colleges and high schools, molding a new generation of fo

Phoenix Comic Fest will celebrate all things “geek” May 24–27, and while much of the science at the four-day event will be fiction, some will be the real

With schools back in session after the #RedforEd teacher walkout, and summer vacation just a few days away in most districts, the intensity of the Arizona education movement has relaxed into a stea

Journalists who report on major environmental issues — climate change, excess water and drought — often struggle to find effective ways to connect their stories to the public.

The California clapper rail is a chicken-sized bird with slender legs, brown feathers and a long beak. It makes its home in the salt marshes of the San Francisco Bay.

As Arizona State University has worked to expand access to higher education, it has added services to support students who need a boost, including specialized peer coaching.

Hawaii’s Big Island has been under siege for the last two weeks due to violent activity from the Kilauea volcano, which has produced haunting images: spewing ash and toxic gases, lava pouring throu

Roughly 80 percent of the 62,000 refugees who have come to live in Arizona since the

Arizona State University’s Ira A.

Candidates running for political office have typically been expected to keep their noses clean and offer voters a crime-free reputation. Those days seem to be behind us.

We say we can lose ourselves in a good book. But more often, a good book may actually be where we can find ourselves.

Paulette Zinzun, a political science student at Arizona State University's Tempe campus, splits her time between school and working at Arizona’s capitol.

Arizona State University Biodesign Institute executive director Josh LaBaer hosted more than 50 community members May 6 at BLD restaurant in Chandler.

When a child dies because of an abusive caregiver, hearts break and headlines blare. Teddy bears pile up at memorials while the public demands action and accountability.

Three Arizona State University multidisciplinary student teams designed concepts around zero waste, the circular economy and public art.

The drone threads its way through the disaster area, beneath ceilings and power lines, through narrow corridors, sewer pipes and hallways. Bodies and survivors lie under rubble.

A portrait of Florence Nightingale hangs on the wall in the nursing education building at Eastern Arizona College’s campus in Thatcher, Arizona, about 170 miles southeast of Phoenix.

Pam Marshall, associate professor of genetics and cell biology, was part of an interdisciplinary team of researchers from Arizona State University and Columbus State University to publish new findi

The car may be a hybrid, but it’s still also a Camaro, so it’ll lay down that famous rumble on the track. But how will it hold up against the competition?

Most people go to college to enhance their education, bolster their professional status and increase their earning power.

When it comes to matching simplicity with staggering creative potential, DNA may hold the prize.

In the 1950s, after the Indian Relocation Act was enacted, Priscilla Espinoza’s family moved from the Gila River Indian Community in the far southeast Valley to Southern Cali

The popular meme proclaiming that

High school sometimes seems like a Darwinian environment: survival is dependent on keeping up with the crowd, creating barriers, and maintaining the status quo.

Editor’s note: This is part of a series of profiles for spring 2018 commencement

An Arizona State University economist said the Grand Canyon State is riding the crest of an eight-year prosperity wave, firmly establishing Arizona as a top 10 state for job creation and population

Anyone who has children knows what kids say they will do and what they actually do can be very different.

Despite its short existence on campus, the Green Devil Network at Arizona State University continues to grow to new heights.

A new collaboration between Arizona State University’s Pat Tillman Veterans Center and the Public Service Academy will now move forward after receiving a $100,000 grant from Women & Philanthrop

As an Arizona State University graduate student, Rachel Yoho wanted to push the boundaries of renewable energy research.

In March it was announced that the Arizona State University Sou

Former FBI Director James Comey has said he thought President Donald Trump might lie about the nature of their meetings, so he kept meticulous notes.

April

We encounter light-emitting diodes on a daily basis — the indicator lights on our smartphones, on the screens of our flat-panel TVs and in the latest energy-efficient light bulbs.

We are often quick to thank military personnel for their service, but do we really offer the necessary support for them and their families?

Parkinson’s disease (PD) affects 7 million to 10 million people worldwide and is the leading movement-related disorder, causing progressive symptoms of rigidity and tremor.

These are good times to be a socialist. In the not-so-distant past, that moniker was wielded as a slur to decimate a left-leaning political opponent or to besmirch their character.

Attention all study-weary college students: Step away from the 5-hour Energy, double-shot lattes and sugar-laden sports drinks.

About 200 to 400 million years after the Big Bang created the universe, the first stars began to appear.

This spring, the College of Nursing and Health Innovation at Arizona State University quietly launched a much-anticipated official internship program with the aim of setting health students u

When Robert Page walks through the 4 million honey bees housed at Arizona State University, he sees the potential to better understand how to survive tough living conditions.

A team of scientists from Arizona State University’s School of Molecular Sciences has begun rethinking the evolutionary history of photochemical reaction centers (RCs).

Imagine a basic, primitive life form on a sandy beach. Its primary survival tactic is to get out of the way of potential predators. What is the simplest way it could move?

DNA — since the world first saw its iconic double helix structure in 1953, it has given scientists a treasure trove of insights into human health and uniqueness.

Around four billion years ago, the moon had a magnetic field that was about as strong as Earth’s magnetic field is today.

Arizona State University archivist Nancy Godoy begins her "Archival and Preservation" workshop with a startling statistic: Minority communities constitute 42 percent of Arizona's population,

An app to help teachers locate students in an emergency, diagnostics to identify dangerous bacteria in Oak Creek and technology that supports homeless community outreach were among 40 projects pres

Folding towels. Peeling fruit. Scratching microphones. Hearing sweet nothings whispered in your ear.

Arizona State University, in partnership with Valley of the Sun United Way, hosted Sun Devils UNITE, a week of philanthropy, education and service

Cities and the natural world seem to be at opposite ends of a spectrum, at least according to the dominant thinking of city dwellers like Woody Allen and mankind in general for the past 11,000 year

Like many children who grow up with an incarcerated parent, it took Deborah Jiang Stein years to step out from the shadow of societal stigma and personal shame, eventually detailing her experience

Editor's note: Read more of the highlights from the ASU + GSV Summit on our

Editor's note: Read more of the highlights from the ASU + GSV Summit on our blog

Editor's note: Read more of the highlights from the ASU + GSV Summit on our blog

Schools. Hospitals. Laboratories. Designers and artists do as much work outside their practice rooms and studios as they do inside those traditional spaces. 

Editor's note: ASU Now will be covering this week's ASU + GSV Summit in San Diego, an event that started in 2010 with a collabor

Editor's note: Read more of the highlights from the ASU + GSV Summit on our blog

All over the world, archaeologists are constantly collecting data.

Editor's note: Read more of the highlights from the ASU + GSV Summit on our blog

Editor's note: Read more of the highlights from the ASU + GSV Summit on our

Editor's note: Read more of the highlights from the ASU + GSV Summit on our blog

Editor's note: Read more of the highlights from the ASU + GSV Summit on our blog

Editor's note: Read more of the highlights from the ASU + GSV Summit on our blog

Editor's note: Read more of the highlights from the ASU + GSV Summit on our blog

Arizona State University online student Alexa Scholl was expecting to talk to a reporter last Tuesday about qualifying as a Truman Scholar finalist.

About 252 million years ago, more than 90 percent of all animal life on Earth went extinct.

It is mid-July and hundreds of children are running around the grounds at Camp Tontozona in Payson.

It’s been almost 30 years since Salt-N-Pepa implored Americans to set their puritanical misgivings aside and talk about sex, and yet we sti

The Arizona State University Action Lab at EdPlus and The Boston Consulting Group (BCG) have unveiled a new study called “Making Digital Learning Work: Success Strategies From Six Leading Universit

Higher education in the United States must intensify the pace of innovation to keep up with changes in the workforce, according to Michael Crow, president of Arizona State University.

Adolescence is a time when biological changes in the body happen faster than psychological changes, a mismatch that creates challenges for teenagers that can lead to problem behaviors, depression o

Starting this week, Arizona's border will see more boots on the ground as hundreds of

A group of interdisciplinary Arizona State University scholars are conducting research to challenge and explore our notions of health through the Institute for Humanities Research’s (IHR) 

Across the world of mammals, teeth come in all sorts of shapes and sizes.

Dogs — they’re our best friends but there’s still a lot we don’t know about them: what they daydream about, if they’re really smiling, why they’re scared and how we can help.

In 2013 Arizona State University researchers Paulo and Jana Shakarian collaborated on a book that explored cyberwarfare from “a human-centric viewpoint,” as Paulo Shakarian described it.

Two recent fatalities related to autonomous vehicles are raising concerns about trade-offs between societal progress and human collateral damage.

Part of the mission of Arizona State University is to enhance its local impact and social embeddedness, and one of the best ways to achieve that is to connect people.

With the midterm elections just months away, the issue of health care is once again a topic of conversation in the halls of Congress, in boardrooms and at dinner tables across the country.

The saga of this high school robotics team is a textbook Cinderella story.

Brand new school. No traditions or track records. Smart but inexperienced kids. Hardscrabble desert farm town.

Preliminary results from a survey of youths in Arizona show worrying trends concerning gun violence and drug use, according to a presentation at Arizona State University on Friday.

Military experts, strategists, academics and national security thought leaders will gather at an international conference Monday hosted by Arizona State University and D.C.-based think tank New Ame

The world of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) has a problem: Women are underrepresented.

The sun is made almost entirely of hydrogen and helium. Earth, on the other hand, is made mostly of oxygen packed into various compounds. So are its rocky planet neighbors.

Think of someone you trust. What is it about them that makes them trustworthy?

A diagnosis of cancer or other serious disease often brings a barrage of information about what to expect physically, along with pressing decisions and questions.

Girl power reached new heights when about 100 Girl Scouts from metro Phoenix raided Arizona State University’s Tempe campus for the annual Girl Scouts for Engineering Awareness and Retention Day on

We worry about a lot of dangers in the modern world, but what's actually most likely to hurt us?

It's an actuary's job to know the answers — or at least the probabilities.

As women demand more equity in the workplace, there’s no doubt they are underrepresented among the big technology companies.

Most people go to college to broaden their horizons. U.S. Air Force veteran Christopher Ames went back to Arizona State University with a laser focus to solve one particular problem.

Steven Pinker has a message for all those standing at the ready, poised to raise the doomsday alarm at a moment’s notice: Not so fast.

If you believe it, you can achieve it.

On April 3, 1968, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

Step into the bookstore on Arizona State University's Tempe campus and you'll see the familiar vibrant and promotional images that typically don ASU's vinyl event banners.

The physical fitness arena is no stranger to fads. One day it’s yoga this, the next it’s CrossFit that.

The School of Social Transformation at Arizona State University is a collaborating partner of the Race, Sex, Power 2018 conference — an event structu

How should urban planners and policy-makers manage autonomous vehicles?

According to the director of Health Innovation Programs at Arizona State University's College of Nursing and Health Innovation, the integration of artificial intelligence into health care is inevit

Genes and proteins play essential roles in the maintenance of health and the development of disease and are the focus of the fields of genomics and proteomics, respectively.

"Rio Reimagined," a forward-looking project to develop 45 miles of the Rio Salado, held its public launch Friday in Tempe as city, county, federal and tribal leaders gathered to review the plan tha

March

On one of the most memorable days of her life, Kaye Reed found herself holding the jawbone of an ancestor who lived 2.8 million years ago.

People of a certain age who grew up watching a certain cartoon dad have been voicing a question since the turn of the millennium.

Tragic history was made recently in Tempe when a self-driving car hit and killed a human

The global decline of amphibians over the past three decades is alarming, with as many as 200 amphibian species going extinct since the late 1980s.

Fake news loves a fool.

Just as the cotton gin, steam power and machine tools changed the world during the Industrial Revolution, the gig economy and artificial intelligence (AI) are a reality today and promise to moderni

Partisanship in Congress has grown so extreme that there is little incentive for elected officials to work together — and it might take a catastrophe for the situation to improve.

Arizona State University President Michael Crow sent an open letter on March 28 to the ASU community committing ASU to be the largest fair trade university in the U.S.

Benjamin Blonder's frame of reference for heirloom foods goes far beyond Berkshire pork or San Marzano tomatoes.

Custard apples. Sapodilla fruit. Brazil plums. Cacao.

If you happened to notice more maroon and gold than usual Tuesday on Tempe's bicycles, trains and buses, it wasn't a coincidence. 

In today’s fast-moving, high-tech world, we leave digital footprints nearly everywhere we go, our sensitive personal information is under attack from those who want to track our habits or steal our

The Ak-Chin Indian Community has made a philanthropic donation to benefit the Indian Legal Program (ILP) at the Sandra Day O’Connor Coll

Phoenix was recently named as a finalist in Bloomberg Philanthropies’ 2018 Mayors Challenge on the strength of its proposal for a first-of-its-ki

The current method of programming autonomous vehicles may not be safe, according to Aviral Shrivastava, a computer science associate professor in Arizona State University’s Ira A.

Engineering created modern Phoenix. 

It’s a bright, sunny morning in central Phoenix for Alicia Gonzales, a 2005 alumna of Arizona State University's School of Community Resources and Development.

Earlier this week, the first fatal accident involving an autonomous vehicle occurred in Tempe, Arizona.

The legal drinking age in the United States might be 21 years, but teenagers and pre-teens drink over 10 percent of all alcohol consumed in the country.

Mayo Clinic School of Medicine recently held a national summit on innovations in physician diversity sponsored by Arizona State University.

Arizona State University will answer an international call to action this Saturday when the school participates in Earth Hour 2018. 

If you had the opportunity to make a difference in the world, would you clean up coastlines and oceans? Provide electricity to remote villages? Bring back a species from the edge of extinction?

TRAPPIST-1 is an ultra-cool red dwarf star that is slightly larger, but much more massive, than the planet Jupiter, located about 40 light-years from the sun in the constellation Aquarius.

Rolf Halden studies the impact of dangerous chemicals on human health.

In early March, the Center for Global Health in ASU’s School of Human Evolution and Social Change hosted this year’s Society for Economic Anthropology (SEA) international conference, with participa

The Juste family church tipi has been in service, helping heal the Salt River Gila community, for over 25 years.

Many people believe in the Golden Rule: "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you."

In the early morning hours of Saturday, March 17, while many Valley residents were sleeping off their pre-St.

As his retirement approached, John P. Nerison knew he wanted to give back with volunteer work — and not just fish on Idaho’s beautiful rivers, though he does that, too.

In 2010, Arizona State University Associate Professor Bertha Manninen wrote an article on the topic of abortion for th

Arizona has a rich historical legacy, and there’s no better time to appreciate it than in March, when temperate weather combines with opportunity for adventure during Arizona Archaeology and Herita

For most people, a spring-training baseball game means hot dogs and sunshine, but for a group of ASU students, the games mean thousands of empty bottles, slimy yogurt lids and handfuls of noodles.

According to recent reports, diabetes is on the rise among youth in America, with minorities at particular risk.

St. Patrick’s Day is a fun, hybrid celebration — a mixture of religion and Irish folklore, symbolism and food, plus lots and lots of green beer. (The day after? Sometimes not so much fun.)

In the 1960s, an archaeologist named René Millon began mapping the ancient city of Teotihuacan in Mexico.

Humanities studies and baseball? It’s not exactly an obvious pairing.

In their attempts to untangle the mystery of Alzheimer’s disease, researchers have traditionally focused on damage to the basic building blocks of thought — the neurons.

Social media is indiscriminately ruthless and knows no boundaries — even in remote places such as Indian country.

A leading international society of nanotechnology professionals recently gave its top awards for research to two faculty members and a doctoral student in Arizona State University’s Ira A.

Imagine a year in Africa when summer never arrives. The sky takes on a gray hue during the day and glows red at night. Flowers do not bloom. Trees die in the winter.

As lunchtime nears, stomachs grumble and howl. That hangry sensation can claim control, overriding our ability to consider anything beyond satisfying the emptiness within.

Water — always important, always controversial, always fascinating — remains surprising.

In the wake of the flagship Women’s March in January 2017 and the bombshell #MeToo movement that followed in October, women’s issues have experienced a resurgence in society’s collective consciousn

Daylight saving time is right around the corner, and it's time to set those alarm clocks and watches forward again … Er, wait. Arizona doesn’t do have to do that. And neither does Hawaii.

Giving birth is one of the most universal yet life-changing experiences, and every culture deals with it differently.

Our current approach to cybersecurity is not working and it threatens our democracy, economy and critical infrastructure, according to ASU Biodesign Professor Stephanie Forrest, who spoke to a grou

New research shows that sections of the San Francisco Bay shoreline are sinking at rates of nearly half an inch (10 millimeters) a year.

If you were a divorced parent, wouldn't you wish for a pill that would ensure your kids were less likely to experience depression, substance abuse and behavioral problems?

Lithium-metal batteries are among the most promising candidates for high-density energy storage technology in an expanding range of digital “smart” devices and electrical vehicles, but uncontrolled

Can you unplug from your device and not feel anxious?

Nearly 80 people attended the Biodesign Institute’s latest “Sip of Science” event Sunday evening at Tomaso's restaurant in Phoenix.

From stately cruise ships to Olympic host cities, recent headline-grabbing outbreaks prove that norovirus — an incapacitating and vaccine-less stomach bug that causes vomiting and diarrhea — can st

Sports media is packed with stories of successful athletes whose decision to pursue professional sports paid off, sometimes tremendously.

Science fiction books and movies have largely formed the public's worldview of artificial intelligence, often clouding the truth on where we stand with the technology.

Immigration uncertainty is causing headaches — literally — for millions of Latino parents across the country, regardless of their legal status.

Sometimes experiential learning means getting your hands dirty.

Harvey Weinstein. Kevin Spacey. Bill Cosby. Rob Porter.

Proteins are central players in life processes and are among the most versatile and essential biomolecules.

The Earth and the life living on it must change together.

About the only thing more dangerous than a fake news story is a fake news video.

February

For sheer versatility, there’s no molecule quite like DNA. The iconic double helix carries the genetic blueprint for living forms ranging from single-celled organisms to human beings.

Technology has irreversibly disrupted the labor market and now the nation’s education system must change in order to keep up, according to the president of Arizona State University.

Long ago, about 400,000 years after the beginning of the universe —the Big Bang — the universe was dark.

They are the nation’s largest ethnic minority, claiming nearly 18 percent of the population and 17 percent of the labor force, yet there is growing concern about the impact of Latinos not achieving